2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157415
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation, maternal depression and unintentional childhood injury
Abstract:
Acculturation, maternal depression and unintentional childhood injury
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Contact Telephone:512.471.9079
Co-Authors:Weakly, Jane Garrett
Problem: Maternal factors, such as depression, place children at greater risk for injury. Few published studies have assessed demographic characteristics of both Mexican-born and U.S.-born women in relation to depressive symptoms in the same study, and none have studied the relationship of depression to childhood safety in these two groups. Theoretical framework: The Health Belief Model provided the conceptual framework for this study. This model supports health behaviors requiring long-term modification. Description of the sample: The sample consisted of 82 low-income women; 66% were monolingual Spanish speakers. Participants were mothers of 1 to 4 year old children, living in a small community adjacent to a metropolitan area in Texas. Hispanics represent the majority of residents, with 58% of children living in economically disadvantaged homes, a poverty rate unsurpassed in the county. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to control or intervention groups. A pre and posttest, experimental design tested differences in injury health beliefs and depression scores. The experimental group received three visits. Home visits were scheduled within a week of contact, 2 weeks later, then again in a month. The control group received two visits, one within a week of contact and a second visit in 6 weeks. Research findings: The acculturation measure of language was significantly correlated with depression, CES-D scores greater than 16 (r = .-394, p = .000), indicating that monolingual Spanish-speakers had less depression than English speakers. Mothers who had higher depressive symptoms as measured by CES-D scores, had lower recognition of the benefits of home-injury prevention behaviors (r = -.274; p = .013) and of barriers to safety (r = -.517; p = .000). In a hierarchical regression analysis, barriers was a predictor for controllable, in-home hazards, R2 = .37, R2? = .12, F? = (2,73) = 6.61, p = .01. Conclusion: The death or injury of a child is devastating and especially tragic when the injury could have been prevented. Responsible clinicians and researchers cannot ignore the risk depression poses. Treatment of mother or child should include relational assessments. Culturally appropriate, best practice approaches to pediatric safety are essential to home hazard identification, and to reducing this health disparity, a Healthy People 2010 goal. The culture of poverty is pervasive. This study introduces an innovative method, use of home visits, for proactively assessing depression as the first step in making intervention possible. Ethnicity and income are repeatedly linked in the literature to childhood injury, and this study begins to clarify one aspect of this linkage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation, maternal depression and unintentional childhood injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157415-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation, maternal depression and unintentional childhood injury </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512.471.9079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherryh@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Weakly, Jane Garrett </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Maternal factors, such as depression, place children at greater risk for injury. Few published studies have assessed demographic characteristics of both Mexican-born and U.S.-born women in relation to depressive symptoms in the same study, and none have studied the relationship of depression to childhood safety in these two groups. Theoretical framework: The Health Belief Model provided the conceptual framework for this study. This model supports health behaviors requiring long-term modification. Description of the sample: The sample consisted of 82 low-income women; 66% were monolingual Spanish speakers. Participants were mothers of 1 to 4 year old children, living in a small community adjacent to a metropolitan area in Texas. Hispanics represent the majority of residents, with 58% of children living in economically disadvantaged homes, a poverty rate unsurpassed in the county. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to control or intervention groups. A pre and posttest, experimental design tested differences in injury health beliefs and depression scores. The experimental group received three visits. Home visits were scheduled within a week of contact, 2 weeks later, then again in a month. The control group received two visits, one within a week of contact and a second visit in 6 weeks. Research findings: The acculturation measure of language was significantly correlated with depression, CES-D scores greater than 16 (r = .-394, p = .000), indicating that monolingual Spanish-speakers had less depression than English speakers. Mothers who had higher depressive symptoms as measured by CES-D scores, had lower recognition of the benefits of home-injury prevention behaviors (r = -.274; p = .013) and of barriers to safety (r = -.517; p = .000). In a hierarchical regression analysis, barriers was a predictor for controllable, in-home hazards, R2 = .37, R2? = .12, F? = (2,73) = 6.61, p = .01. Conclusion: The death or injury of a child is devastating and especially tragic when the injury could have been prevented. Responsible clinicians and researchers cannot ignore the risk depression poses. Treatment of mother or child should include relational assessments. Culturally appropriate, best practice approaches to pediatric safety are essential to home hazard identification, and to reducing this health disparity, a Healthy People 2010 goal. The culture of poverty is pervasive. This study introduces an innovative method, use of home visits, for proactively assessing depression as the first step in making intervention possible. Ethnicity and income are repeatedly linked in the literature to childhood injury, and this study begins to clarify one aspect of this linkage. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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