2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157416
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Themes of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients
Abstract:
Themes of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Tacoma
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1900 Commerce Street, Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA
Contact Telephone:(253) 692-5676
PROBLEM/PURPOSE: With its vital domains of transcendence, meaning and purpose, connectedness, and faith and hope (Doyle, 2002), spirituality in recognized by the World Health Organization as an integral component of palliative care. Although spirituality is related to psychological well being in terminal illness (Reed, 1987), few studies are found that examine this phenomenon in dying persons. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of spirituality in home hospice patients. METHOD: The design was a secondary analysis of patients’ responses to tools and the testing session in a previous study that both combined quantitative and qualitative methods. The tools included the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990), the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969), and the PRQ-85 (Brand & Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987). Specific questions on these tools served as probes for verbal responses that referenced God, a Higher Power, and acts of religiosity. All verbatim content of phases that referenced spirituality were extracted and coded. Secondary analysis grouped the coded phases into themes. SAMPLE: From the original sample of 97 patients, 44 or 45.4% of the participants gave verbal responses that referenced spirituality. The mean age was 66.1 years, there were 26 males and 18 females, and their ethnicity was 37 Caucasian, 4 Mexican-American, 2 African-American, and one unlisted. Their diagnoses were 35 cancer, 4 AIDS, 2 ALS, and 3 end-stage cardiac, and their religious affiliations were: 26 Protestant, 12 Catholic, and 5 other (Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, Mormon, Seventh Day Adventist, and Theocentric). Human subjects approval from the sponsoring university and the two hospice agencies was secured. Inclusion criterion included 30 years of age or older, cognition, English speaking, signed hospice consent, and willing participation. FINDINGS: Life closing spirituality was shaped by a core theme of believing which was central to dying persons. Believing was linked to six other themes: comforting, releasing, connecting, giving, reframing, and requesting. Because of their belief, dying persons felt comforted, released control of their fate to a Higher Power, felt connected and supported, still wanted to give to others, reframed their illness to create positive meanings, and a few still had requests left for God. CONCLUSIONS: The responses of 44 dying patients reinforced the importance of spirituality in hospice/palliative care. For these 44 participants a belief in a Divine Other provided positive benefits that supported them in the dying process. Nonetheless, 53 individuals or 54.6% of the total sample gave no references to spirituality, and one individual expressed discomfort at being asked by a Hospice Chaplain why he stopped going to church. As hospice/palliative care moves toward a multicultural entity that includes various belief systems, spiritual care must be attuned to these differences. Further study is needed to explore the bond that ties human spirituality to dying.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThemes of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157416-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Themes of Spirituality in Home Hospice Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dobratz, Marjorie, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Tacoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1900 Commerce Street, Box 358421, Tacoma, WA, 98402, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(253) 692-5676</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdobratz@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PROBLEM/PURPOSE: With its vital domains of transcendence, meaning and purpose, connectedness, and faith and hope (Doyle, 2002), spirituality in recognized by the World Health Organization as an integral component of palliative care. Although spirituality is related to psychological well being in terminal illness (Reed, 1987), few studies are found that examine this phenomenon in dying persons. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of spirituality in home hospice patients. METHOD: The design was a secondary analysis of patients&rsquo; responses to tools and the testing session in a previous study that both combined quantitative and qualitative methods. The tools included the Life Closure Scale (Dobratz, 1990), the Affect Balance Scale (Bradburn, 1969), and the PRQ-85 (Brand &amp; Weinert, 1981; Weinert, 1987). Specific questions on these tools served as probes for verbal responses that referenced God, a Higher Power, and acts of religiosity. All verbatim content of phases that referenced spirituality were extracted and coded. Secondary analysis grouped the coded phases into themes. SAMPLE: From the original sample of 97 patients, 44 or 45.4% of the participants gave verbal responses that referenced spirituality. The mean age was 66.1 years, there were 26 males and 18 females, and their ethnicity was 37 Caucasian, 4 Mexican-American, 2 African-American, and one unlisted. Their diagnoses were 35 cancer, 4 AIDS, 2 ALS, and 3 end-stage cardiac, and their religious affiliations were: 26 Protestant, 12 Catholic, and 5 other (Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, Mormon, Seventh Day Adventist, and Theocentric). Human subjects approval from the sponsoring university and the two hospice agencies was secured. Inclusion criterion included 30 years of age or older, cognition, English speaking, signed hospice consent, and willing participation. FINDINGS: Life closing spirituality was shaped by a core theme of believing which was central to dying persons. Believing was linked to six other themes: comforting, releasing, connecting, giving, reframing, and requesting. Because of their belief, dying persons felt comforted, released control of their fate to a Higher Power, felt connected and supported, still wanted to give to others, reframed their illness to create positive meanings, and a few still had requests left for God. CONCLUSIONS: The responses of 44 dying patients reinforced the importance of spirituality in hospice/palliative care. For these 44 participants a belief in a Divine Other provided positive benefits that supported them in the dying process. Nonetheless, 53 individuals or 54.6% of the total sample gave no references to spirituality, and one individual expressed discomfort at being asked by a Hospice Chaplain why he stopped going to church. As hospice/palliative care moves toward a multicultural entity that includes various belief systems, spiritual care must be attuned to these differences. Further study is needed to explore the bond that ties human spirituality to dying. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.