2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157420
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collecting Parenting Psychophysiological Measures: the Family Health Project
Abstract:
Collecting Parenting Psychophysiological Measures: the Family Health Project
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Carrere, Sybil, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA
Co-Authors:Cheryl L. Cooke, PhD, RN
Overview: Purpose: To describe the methodological issues and challenges associated with data collection for biobehavioral measures of family processes in the University of Washington Family Health Project. Rationale and Methods: It can be very difficult to conduct biobehavioral research with families in a manner that captures the precision of the laboratory setting and the natural qualities of the home environment. Collecting physiological data can be a challenge. Young children often find it difficult to remain as immobile as is necessary to collect impedance cardiography and electrocardiogram data. Following precise protocols in measuring children’s urinary and saliva endocrine levels can also be a challenge because of circadian rhythms, health considerations, and dietary limitations. Capturing behavioral processes that are natural can be a challenge because of the necessary presence of video cameras. Overall, there are often aspects of collecting data that are invasive and require delicate and careful communication with families. For example, the Family Health Project developed special teaching sessions with families to ease the discomfort of a physical exam used to determine the pubertal status of the children. Cultural sensitivities, such as taboos of spitting among some Asian cultures, also require special attention to communication and procedures used with families. In this symposium the speakers will present a series of methodology papers on the different protocols that are used for the Family Health Project at the University of Washington in order to measure biobehavioral family processes in both laboratory and home settings. The ongoing longitudinal study is evaluating parenting behaviors that facilitate children’s physical and mental health as the children make the transition from middle childhood to adolescence. At each time point the research project utilizes 2 home visits and 3 laboratory visits to assess children’s physical and mental health, their pubertal status, social competence with peers, and behavior in the classroom and home. Family and marital biobehavioral interactions are also assessed in both the home and the laboratory visits. The symposium will address the challenges that this kind of research presents and the techniques that are used to make participation in the study both educational and fun for the family. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health. (#R01-MH42484)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollecting Parenting Psychophysiological Measures: the Family Health Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157420-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collecting Parenting Psychophysiological Measures: the Family Health Project </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carrere, Sybil, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl L. Cooke, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overview: Purpose: To describe the methodological issues and challenges associated with data collection for biobehavioral measures of family processes in the University of Washington Family Health Project. Rationale and Methods: It can be very difficult to conduct biobehavioral research with families in a manner that captures the precision of the laboratory setting and the natural qualities of the home environment. Collecting physiological data can be a challenge. Young children often find it difficult to remain as immobile as is necessary to collect impedance cardiography and electrocardiogram data. Following precise protocols in measuring children&rsquo;s urinary and saliva endocrine levels can also be a challenge because of circadian rhythms, health considerations, and dietary limitations. Capturing behavioral processes that are natural can be a challenge because of the necessary presence of video cameras. Overall, there are often aspects of collecting data that are invasive and require delicate and careful communication with families. For example, the Family Health Project developed special teaching sessions with families to ease the discomfort of a physical exam used to determine the pubertal status of the children. Cultural sensitivities, such as taboos of spitting among some Asian cultures, also require special attention to communication and procedures used with families. In this symposium the speakers will present a series of methodology papers on the different protocols that are used for the Family Health Project at the University of Washington in order to measure biobehavioral family processes in both laboratory and home settings. The ongoing longitudinal study is evaluating parenting behaviors that facilitate children&rsquo;s physical and mental health as the children make the transition from middle childhood to adolescence. At each time point the research project utilizes 2 home visits and 3 laboratory visits to assess children&rsquo;s physical and mental health, their pubertal status, social competence with peers, and behavior in the classroom and home. Family and marital biobehavioral interactions are also assessed in both the home and the laboratory visits. The symposium will address the challenges that this kind of research presents and the techniques that are used to make participation in the study both educational and fun for the family. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health. (#R01-MH42484)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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