2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157422
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Marital Interaction Session: Integrating Marital Behavior and Physiology
Abstract:
The Marital Interaction Session: Integrating Marital Behavior and Physiology
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Doohan, Eve-Anne , MA
P.I. Institution Name:Unviersity of Washington
Contact Address:Department of Communication, Seattle, , WA
Co-Authors:Cheryl Beardslee, B A; Stephanie Jones, B A
Purpose: To describe the methodological issues and challenges associated with the marital interaction session of the Family Health Project. Rationale and Methods: The marital interaction session assesses the quality of the husband and wife’s relationship. The laboratory session is videotaped. The couple begins by participating in the Oral History Interview, in which they tell the story of how they met, fell in love, decided to get married, and the adjustments and transitions they have made along the way. The interview also includes questions about their philosophy of marriage. The session facilitator and a physiological technician then attach sensors to each spouse to collect electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography, and respiration data. A baseline reading of their physiology is then obtained while the husband and wife count colors on a television monitor for ten minutes. The husband and wife each complete an Areas of Disagreement questionnaire (Knox, 1971) to identify ongoing areas of disagreement in their relationship. The couple next participates in the Play-by-Play interview where the facilitator helps the couple to identify several emotionally salient problem topics for their marriage. The couple is then left for ten minutes to engage in a problem solving discussion of those topics. Physiological and video data are acquired during this problem solving discussion. The couple then watches a video playback of their discussion twice, one time rating how positive or negative they were feeling during the interaction, another time rating how positive or negative they think their partner was behaving during the interaction. Physiological data are acquired during both of these video recalls. The physiological sensors are then removed and the couple is debriefed. Discussion and Implications: There are several methodological challenges associated with this laboratory visit. The first challenge is scheduling families, which is challenging for this session because of the length of the session (3-4 hours), and the need for childcare and transportation to the lab. The second challenge is staff training and coverage for each of the roles: facilitator, physiological technician, and computer technician. Of particular importance is the need to make the couple feel comfortable discussing highly personal relational issues with members of the research team, and ensuring that the couple does not leave the session feeling negative about their relationship. The third challenge is obtaining reliable physiological measures and dealing with complications that may occur during the session. The fourth challenge is coding and data analysis of both the physiological and behavioral data. We will describe the procedures, methods, and materials we use in our study, and how we address the challenges described above. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health. (MH42484)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Marital Interaction Session: Integrating Marital Behavior and Physiologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157422-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Marital Interaction Session: Integrating Marital Behavior and Physiology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doohan, Eve-Anne , MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Unviersity of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Communication, Seattle, , WA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Beardslee, B A; Stephanie Jones, B A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe the methodological issues and challenges associated with the marital interaction session of the Family Health Project. Rationale and Methods: The marital interaction session assesses the quality of the husband and wife&rsquo;s relationship. The laboratory session is videotaped. The couple begins by participating in the Oral History Interview, in which they tell the story of how they met, fell in love, decided to get married, and the adjustments and transitions they have made along the way. The interview also includes questions about their philosophy of marriage. The session facilitator and a physiological technician then attach sensors to each spouse to collect electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography, and respiration data. A baseline reading of their physiology is then obtained while the husband and wife count colors on a television monitor for ten minutes. The husband and wife each complete an Areas of Disagreement questionnaire (Knox, 1971) to identify ongoing areas of disagreement in their relationship. The couple next participates in the Play-by-Play interview where the facilitator helps the couple to identify several emotionally salient problem topics for their marriage. The couple is then left for ten minutes to engage in a problem solving discussion of those topics. Physiological and video data are acquired during this problem solving discussion. The couple then watches a video playback of their discussion twice, one time rating how positive or negative they were feeling during the interaction, another time rating how positive or negative they think their partner was behaving during the interaction. Physiological data are acquired during both of these video recalls. The physiological sensors are then removed and the couple is debriefed. Discussion and Implications: There are several methodological challenges associated with this laboratory visit. The first challenge is scheduling families, which is challenging for this session because of the length of the session (3-4 hours), and the need for childcare and transportation to the lab. The second challenge is staff training and coverage for each of the roles: facilitator, physiological technician, and computer technician. Of particular importance is the need to make the couple feel comfortable discussing highly personal relational issues with members of the research team, and ensuring that the couple does not leave the session feeling negative about their relationship. The third challenge is obtaining reliable physiological measures and dealing with complications that may occur during the session. The fourth challenge is coding and data analysis of both the physiological and behavioral data. We will describe the procedures, methods, and materials we use in our study, and how we address the challenges described above. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health. (MH42484) </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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