2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157423
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disclosure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Diverse Population
Abstract:
Disclosure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Diverse Population
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of HI at Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene
Contact Address:2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster 437, Honolulu, , HI , 96822, USA
Co-Authors:Lois Magnussen, EdD, APRN; Mary Oneha, PhD, APRN
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is pervasive in American society. Approximately 25% of women report being assaulted during their lifetime. Domestic violence is the most common cause of non-fatal injury to women in the United States (Kyriacou et al, 1999, Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). The purpose of this study was to determine how frequently IPV was disclosed to health care providers in community health centers serving a multi-cultural population. Battered women make up 18-25% of women who seek care at primary care clinics (CDC, 2000). Reported rates of IPV have a wide range of variation between ethnic groups. Women of Asian/Pacific Islander background report a lower rate of IPV than other ethnic groups (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). In Hawaii, 70% of the population is Asian/Pacific Islander. Estimates are that at least 20% of all women between the ages of 19-64 have been victims of IPV (Domestic Violence Family Court Monitoring Project, 1996). The level of willingness to disclose abuse may vary widely between ethnic groups. Cultural expectations, health care system issues and client-provider interaction may impede disclosure and prevent women from receiving effective care (Shoultz, et al, 2002, Campbell, 1993). Faculty members and leaders from four community health centers developed a community partnership using participatory research methods. The data collection tool was developed with input from all four centers to meet the needs of the health care center while collecting data for the study. A retrospective review of records of women between the ages of 19-64 who used the health center during 1998-2002 was conducted by agency personnel. Data analysis was undertaken by the research group with particular emphasis on understanding the findings within the context of the different environments of the four health centers and the distinct populations served. The majority of clients at the community health centers were Asian/Pacific Islanders. Documentation of IPV was found in approximately 9% of the 371 records reviewed. Rates of disclosure varied between ethnic populations. Implications for documentation, screening and culturally appropriate interventions will be discussed. Funded by School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisclosure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Diverse Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157423-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Disclosure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Diverse Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of HI at Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster 437, Honolulu, , HI , 96822, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois Magnussen, EdD, APRN; Mary Oneha, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is pervasive in American society. Approximately 25% of women report being assaulted during their lifetime. Domestic violence is the most common cause of non-fatal injury to women in the United States (Kyriacou et al, 1999, Tjaden &amp; Thoennes, 2000). The purpose of this study was to determine how frequently IPV was disclosed to health care providers in community health centers serving a multi-cultural population. Battered women make up 18-25% of women who seek care at primary care clinics (CDC, 2000). Reported rates of IPV have a wide range of variation between ethnic groups. Women of Asian/Pacific Islander background report a lower rate of IPV than other ethnic groups (Tjaden &amp; Thoennes, 2000). In Hawaii, 70% of the population is Asian/Pacific Islander. Estimates are that at least 20% of all women between the ages of 19-64 have been victims of IPV (Domestic Violence Family Court Monitoring Project, 1996). The level of willingness to disclose abuse may vary widely between ethnic groups. Cultural expectations, health care system issues and client-provider interaction may impede disclosure and prevent women from receiving effective care (Shoultz, et al, 2002, Campbell, 1993). Faculty members and leaders from four community health centers developed a community partnership using participatory research methods. The data collection tool was developed with input from all four centers to meet the needs of the health care center while collecting data for the study. A retrospective review of records of women between the ages of 19-64 who used the health center during 1998-2002 was conducted by agency personnel. Data analysis was undertaken by the research group with particular emphasis on understanding the findings within the context of the different environments of the four health centers and the distinct populations served. The majority of clients at the community health centers were Asian/Pacific Islanders. Documentation of IPV was found in approximately 9% of the 371 records reviewed. Rates of disclosure varied between ethnic populations. Implications for documentation, screening and culturally appropriate interventions will be discussed. Funded by School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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