2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157424
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents’ Motives for Social Comparison Related to Pregnancy Prevention
Abstract:
Adolescents’ Motives for Social Comparison Related to Pregnancy Prevention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Tigges, Beth, PhD, RN, CPNP,
P.I. Institution Name:BC College of Nursing
Contact Address:MSC09, 53501, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA
Specific Aims: This paper describes the motives that adolescents have for comparing themselves with others when they think about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Rationale and Background: The reduction of unintended adolescent pregnancy is a goal of Healthy People 2010. Yet pregnancy prevention programs have shown limited effectiveness to date. An understanding of the psychological processes that lead to adolescent pregnancy would allow development of more effective prevention programs. Social comparison (comparing one’s self to other people) is a psychological process that may have significant implications for adolescent pregnancy prevention. Most social comparison research has focused on adults and relatively fixed characteristics (e.g. academic ability) or situations (e.g. breast cancer). Adolescents’ motives for comparing with others, particularly with respect to changeable behaviors, have not been studied. Methods: Eight (4 male and 4 female) focus groups of 9th-grade (14-16 year old) adolescents were recruited from health and physical education classes at a public high school. The adolescents (N=50) were 56% female, 54% Hispanic white, 40% non-Hispanic white, and 6% American Indian. 96% were born in the U.S. and 4% were born in Mexico. All adolescents reported that they could read and speak English when recruited. Past sexual intercourse was reported by 33%. Adolescents’ assent and active parental consent was obtained for participation. Focus groups were held in a private conference room at the school during school hours for 1-1/2 to 2 hours each. Participants were asked a series of 11 open-ended questions. Social comparison was initially defined as comparison with others, but probes also asked why adolescents interact with or seek information from others. Each group ended with a participant verification phase. All discussions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analyzed for themes using content analysis. Results: Adolescents talked freely about the reasons that they compare themselves to others when thinking about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Data analysis demonstrates nine motives for comparing with others: (1) Thinking about the future (by comparing with proxy others); (2) Distancing (showing one what not to be); (3) Modeling (showing one what to be); (4) Self-Enhancement (to make one feel better emotionally); (5) Self-Evaluation (to evaluate one’s standing relative to others); (6) Similarity-Identification (to feel similar to or connected with others); (7) Emotional Support (to get moral support, sympathy, or understanding); (8) Instrumental Support (to get advice, assistance, or information); and (9) Altruism (to help others). The social support and altruism motives were only elicited when comparisons were defined as interactions with others. Conclusion: Social comparison was a common activity among the adolescents in this study. Three of the motives (thinking about the future, distancing, and the desire to compare with/be with similar others) have not been identified before as primary motives for social comparison, yet these were the most frequently discussed reasons for comparing by these groups of adolescents. Data from the focus groups will be used to develop an instrument to measure social comparison motives. Future phases of this research will examine if motives vary across groups of adolescents who are making decisions about remaining abstinent, initiating sexual activity, or contraception. (Funded by N.I.H., N.I.N.R., Grant 1 R15 NR05054-01A2)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents’ Motives for Social Comparison Related to Pregnancy Preventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157424-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents&rsquo; Motives for Social Comparison Related to Pregnancy Prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tigges, Beth, PhD, RN, CPNP, </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BC College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09, 53501, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: This paper describes the motives that adolescents have for comparing themselves with others when they think about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Rationale and Background: The reduction of unintended adolescent pregnancy is a goal of Healthy People 2010. Yet pregnancy prevention programs have shown limited effectiveness to date. An understanding of the psychological processes that lead to adolescent pregnancy would allow development of more effective prevention programs. Social comparison (comparing one&rsquo;s self to other people) is a psychological process that may have significant implications for adolescent pregnancy prevention. Most social comparison research has focused on adults and relatively fixed characteristics (e.g. academic ability) or situations (e.g. breast cancer). Adolescents&rsquo; motives for comparing with others, particularly with respect to changeable behaviors, have not been studied. Methods: Eight (4 male and 4 female) focus groups of 9th-grade (14-16 year old) adolescents were recruited from health and physical education classes at a public high school. The adolescents (N=50) were 56% female, 54% Hispanic white, 40% non-Hispanic white, and 6% American Indian. 96% were born in the U.S. and 4% were born in Mexico. All adolescents reported that they could read and speak English when recruited. Past sexual intercourse was reported by 33%. Adolescents&rsquo; assent and active parental consent was obtained for participation. Focus groups were held in a private conference room at the school during school hours for 1-1/2 to 2 hours each. Participants were asked a series of 11 open-ended questions. Social comparison was initially defined as comparison with others, but probes also asked why adolescents interact with or seek information from others. Each group ended with a participant verification phase. All discussions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analyzed for themes using content analysis. Results: Adolescents talked freely about the reasons that they compare themselves to others when thinking about pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. Data analysis demonstrates nine motives for comparing with others: (1) Thinking about the future (by comparing with proxy others); (2) Distancing (showing one what not to be); (3) Modeling (showing one what to be); (4) Self-Enhancement (to make one feel better emotionally); (5) Self-Evaluation (to evaluate one&rsquo;s standing relative to others); (6) Similarity-Identification (to feel similar to or connected with others); (7) Emotional Support (to get moral support, sympathy, or understanding); (8) Instrumental Support (to get advice, assistance, or information); and (9) Altruism (to help others). The social support and altruism motives were only elicited when comparisons were defined as interactions with others. Conclusion: Social comparison was a common activity among the adolescents in this study. Three of the motives (thinking about the future, distancing, and the desire to compare with/be with similar others) have not been identified before as primary motives for social comparison, yet these were the most frequently discussed reasons for comparing by these groups of adolescents. Data from the focus groups will be used to develop an instrument to measure social comparison motives. Future phases of this research will examine if motives vary across groups of adolescents who are making decisions about remaining abstinent, initiating sexual activity, or contraception. (Funded by N.I.H., N.I.N.R., Grant 1 R15 NR05054-01A2)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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