Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Highlighting Strengths of Adolescents in Juvenile Detention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Highlighting Strengths of Adolescents in Juvenile Detention
Abstract:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Highlighting Strengths of Adolescents in Juvenile Detention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Badger, Terry, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Professor Emeritus
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85737, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6058
Purpose/Aims: Adolescents in juvenile detention represent a particularly vulnerable group of teenagers. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the inner strengths and assets that adolescents are able to call forth in times of extreme stress as they cope with the experience of living behind locked gates and high, razor-wire-topped walls. Background: Adolescents who are arrested and transported to juvenile hall, arrive in handcuffs and/or chains, pass through a booking process, exchange their clothes and personal possessions for institutional clothing and necessary hygiene items, learn numerous rules and regulations, and are finally taken to their assigned unit. Thus begins an indeterminate length of incarceration away from home punctuated by at least 3 court appearances. Fears of the judge, probation staff, and fellow detainees mix with fears about what is happening to family and friends. Methods: A series of ethnographic research studies provide the data for this presentation. Intensive intervals of participant observation, in-depth formal and informal individual and group interviews, review of documents and verbal and written life histories comprised the methods employed in the ethnographic research design. The additional use of participatory research strategies facilitated the discovery of numerous examples of how the adolescents called on their inner resources in order to deal with the incarceration, separation from home and family, numerous court appearances, and rulings of the presiding judge. Over 150 adolescents participated at different times in this series of studies in an extended program of research conducted over a twenty-year interval. Results: These research participants repeatedly demonstrated courage and resourcefulness in the face of the fear and isolation while being detained. Many put on the protective armor provided by an attitude of disinterest and hostility. A number of other less off-putting teen assets emerged from under the surface of this armor in the presence of trusted persons. Among the more positive strengths to emerge were reconnections with religious and spiritual beliefs, re-established and improved relationships with family members, and work on the units to garner rewards for cooperative behavior. The participants also developed resourceful ways to circumvent the endless rules and regulations such as creating their own form of sign language to communicate during long intervals of enforced silence. They learned strategies to use with different staff personalities in order to stay out of trouble. Some used their time-out from society to make resolutions for how they would decrease their risk taking and illegal behaviors when they were released from detention. Some wrote to family, friends, teachers, and classmates to give them advice about how other teenagers should behave to avoid getting arrested. Implications: These examples of strength and resolve should be the focus of further study and the development of interventions that build from strengths and willingness to participate in projects that will improve their lives and those of family and friends.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Highlighting Strengths of Adolescents in Juvenile Detentionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Highlighting Strengths of Adolescents in Juvenile Detention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Badger, Terry, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85737, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6058</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbadger@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Adolescents in juvenile detention represent a particularly vulnerable group of teenagers. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the inner strengths and assets that adolescents are able to call forth in times of extreme stress as they cope with the experience of living behind locked gates and high, razor-wire-topped walls. Background: Adolescents who are arrested and transported to juvenile hall, arrive in handcuffs and/or chains, pass through a booking process, exchange their clothes and personal possessions for institutional clothing and necessary hygiene items, learn numerous rules and regulations, and are finally taken to their assigned unit. Thus begins an indeterminate length of incarceration away from home punctuated by at least 3 court appearances. Fears of the judge, probation staff, and fellow detainees mix with fears about what is happening to family and friends. Methods: A series of ethnographic research studies provide the data for this presentation. Intensive intervals of participant observation, in-depth formal and informal individual and group interviews, review of documents and verbal and written life histories comprised the methods employed in the ethnographic research design. The additional use of participatory research strategies facilitated the discovery of numerous examples of how the adolescents called on their inner resources in order to deal with the incarceration, separation from home and family, numerous court appearances, and rulings of the presiding judge. Over 150 adolescents participated at different times in this series of studies in an extended program of research conducted over a twenty-year interval. Results: These research participants repeatedly demonstrated courage and resourcefulness in the face of the fear and isolation while being detained. Many put on the protective armor provided by an attitude of disinterest and hostility. A number of other less off-putting teen assets emerged from under the surface of this armor in the presence of trusted persons. Among the more positive strengths to emerge were reconnections with religious and spiritual beliefs, re-established and improved relationships with family members, and work on the units to garner rewards for cooperative behavior. The participants also developed resourceful ways to circumvent the endless rules and regulations such as creating their own form of sign language to communicate during long intervals of enforced silence. They learned strategies to use with different staff personalities in order to stay out of trouble. Some used their time-out from society to make resolutions for how they would decrease their risk taking and illegal behaviors when they were released from detention. Some wrote to family, friends, teachers, and classmates to give them advice about how other teenagers should behave to avoid getting arrested. Implications: These examples of strength and resolve should be the focus of further study and the development of interventions that build from strengths and willingness to participate in projects that will improve their lives and those of family and friends.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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