Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Finding and Promoting Connectedness in Reservation-Based BSN Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157426
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Finding and Promoting Connectedness in Reservation-Based BSN Students
Abstract:
Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Finding and Promoting Connectedness in Reservation-Based BSN Students
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Doshier, Sally, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University, Department of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Background/significance: Students from minority groups, including American Indian nurses, face multiple barriers to academic and professional achievement. Cultural issues that reflect different world views and learning preferences, academic preparation, financial support, adjustment difficulties in academic settings perceived as an un-encouraging environment, and family responsibilities are some of the complex and inter-related factors that affect and act as barriers to American Indian students in higher education, including those seeking to enter the profession of nursing (Crow, 1993; Merrill, 1998; Weaver, 2001). In order to improve access to American Indian people who were unable to leave the reservation or preferred not to relocate to a university center, a Nursing Education Center, based on one reservation and adjacent to a second reservation, was developed to provide reservation-based baccalaureate nursing education to residents of those nations. Distance education technologies, traditional classroom and clinical teaching, as well as cultural considerations, have been combined in the design and delivery of this BSN program. Research questions: What is the experience of students earning a BSN in reservation settings distant from the university. How has distance education technology enhanced student learning? How has it been a barrier to learning? Methods: Part of an in-depth, stakeholder-focused program evaluation, these questions were addressed as part of personal interviews with faculty, program director, and program graduates. In addition, focus group interviews with current students yielded further information. Interview and focus group notes and transcripts were analyzed for emerging themes and congruence. Results: Connection was found to be a recurring theme experienced by past and present students as well as nursing program faculty. The experience of earning the nursing degree from a distance involves connection between faculty and students working together. The support of faculty, peers, professionals in home communities, and family were important connections experienced by past and present students. Web-based technologies enhanced connection in online courses, use of library resources, and maintaining contact with classmates after graduation. Users perceived it as more culturally appropriate. Technology as Interactive Instructional Television was a barrier to connection, was felt to promote a feeling of being marginalized, and did not support effective learning. It was perceived as very culturally inappropriate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Finding and Promoting Connectedness in Reservation-Based BSN Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157426-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connectedness in Rural Nursing Distance Education and Rural Practice: Finding and Promoting Connectedness in Reservation-Based BSN Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doshier, Sally, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sally.doshier@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/significance: Students from minority groups, including American Indian nurses, face multiple barriers to academic and professional achievement. Cultural issues that reflect different world views and learning preferences, academic preparation, financial support, adjustment difficulties in academic settings perceived as an un-encouraging environment, and family responsibilities are some of the complex and inter-related factors that affect and act as barriers to American Indian students in higher education, including those seeking to enter the profession of nursing (Crow, 1993; Merrill, 1998; Weaver, 2001). In order to improve access to American Indian people who were unable to leave the reservation or preferred not to relocate to a university center, a Nursing Education Center, based on one reservation and adjacent to a second reservation, was developed to provide reservation-based baccalaureate nursing education to residents of those nations. Distance education technologies, traditional classroom and clinical teaching, as well as cultural considerations, have been combined in the design and delivery of this BSN program. Research questions: What is the experience of students earning a BSN in reservation settings distant from the university. How has distance education technology enhanced student learning? How has it been a barrier to learning? Methods: Part of an in-depth, stakeholder-focused program evaluation, these questions were addressed as part of personal interviews with faculty, program director, and program graduates. In addition, focus group interviews with current students yielded further information. Interview and focus group notes and transcripts were analyzed for emerging themes and congruence. Results: Connection was found to be a recurring theme experienced by past and present students as well as nursing program faculty. The experience of earning the nursing degree from a distance involves connection between faculty and students working together. The support of faculty, peers, professionals in home communities, and family were important connections experienced by past and present students. Web-based technologies enhanced connection in online courses, use of library resources, and maintaining contact with classmates after graduation. Users perceived it as more culturally appropriate. Technology as Interactive Instructional Television was a barrier to connection, was felt to promote a feeling of being marginalized, and did not support effective learning. It was perceived as very culturally inappropriate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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