2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Working Together: A Native Family Addresses Elder Mistreatment Concerns
Abstract:
Working Together: A Native Family Addresses Elder Mistreatment Concerns
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Holkup, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Missoula
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Clarann Weinert, Toni Tripp-Reimer, Emily Matt Salois
Purpose: The purpose of the Caring for Native American Elders project was to develop and pilot a family conference intervention, the Family Care Conference (FCC), for frail Native American elders who are at risk of abuse. The purpose of this presentation is to (a) describe the Family Care Conference intervention, and (b) to report the results of a FCC with a Native American family living on a Western reservation. Background: The incidence of elder abuse is increasing across the nation. The reported rates of substantiated elder abuse among Native American people are nearly twice the rate of their Euro-American counterparts, yet research has virtually ignored this subject. Only five descriptive studies on Native American elder abuse have been reported. No intervention studies have been conducted. Euro-American legal policies, with their emphasis on criminalization and punishment, run counter to the traditional Native emphasis on family unity. The FCC is an adaptation of a child-centered intervention developed by the Maori who felt Western European interventions were undermining their family values. By supporting the traditional strength of Native families working together to solve their problems, the FCC empowers families and facilitates healing when concerns of elder mistreatment arise. Methods: An FCC intervention was pilot tested with one Native family. Two family meetings and two evaluative interviews were conducted. In attendance at the family meetings were the elder and 9 other family members representing four generations. The family's concerns centered on the financial exploitation of a 58 year old elder with multiple, chronic health problems, who had long-term, informal custody of two adolescent children. The family and elder were concerned that he no longer was able to keep up with the needs of the children or enforce adequate boundaries for them. Data were collected through the use of conventional ethnographic field methods of participant and direct observation and formal and informal interviews. The FCC was evaluated using topics and items from an assessment tool used by the Oregon Child Welfare Study. Results: On the whole, the family was pleased with both the process and the outcome of the FCC. The FCC had provided a safe forum for the family to discuss issues that were difficult to discuss among themselves without a facilitator. Although the first plan developed by the family was not completely successful, there was sufficient change to provide some relief for the elder. The family requested and received a follow-up FCC to refine those parts of the first plan that were not working. Implications: The results of this project formed the foundation for its expansion. Continuation of this community-based participatory research project has included addressing the community's concern that, although elder mistreatment does exist within the community, it remains a hidden topic. Raising community awareness has included dissemination of the results of our preliminary work. Additionally, we have hired and trained three FCC facilitators from the community. The facilitators are beginning to take referrals for FCCs. Up to 15 FCCs will be conducted over the course of the next year to determine the feasibility of and implementation logistics for the sustainability of the project in the community. Future research efforts will include the development of a tool-kit that other tribal communities may use to implement a similar intervention with their people and the investigation of ways to sustain the intervention for interested tribal communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorking Together: A Native Family Addresses Elder Mistreatment Concernsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Working Together: A Native Family Addresses Elder Mistreatment Concerns</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holkup, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Missoula</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pholkup@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Clarann Weinert, Toni Tripp-Reimer, Emily Matt Salois</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of the Caring for Native American Elders project was to develop and pilot a family conference intervention, the Family Care Conference (FCC), for frail Native American elders who are at risk of abuse. The purpose of this presentation is to (a) describe the Family Care Conference intervention, and (b) to report the results of a FCC with a Native American family living on a Western reservation. Background: The incidence of elder abuse is increasing across the nation. The reported rates of substantiated elder abuse among Native American people are nearly twice the rate of their Euro-American counterparts, yet research has virtually ignored this subject. Only five descriptive studies on Native American elder abuse have been reported. No intervention studies have been conducted. Euro-American legal policies, with their emphasis on criminalization and punishment, run counter to the traditional Native emphasis on family unity. The FCC is an adaptation of a child-centered intervention developed by the Maori who felt Western European interventions were undermining their family values. By supporting the traditional strength of Native families working together to solve their problems, the FCC empowers families and facilitates healing when concerns of elder mistreatment arise. Methods: An FCC intervention was pilot tested with one Native family. Two family meetings and two evaluative interviews were conducted. In attendance at the family meetings were the elder and 9 other family members representing four generations. The family's concerns centered on the financial exploitation of a 58 year old elder with multiple, chronic health problems, who had long-term, informal custody of two adolescent children. The family and elder were concerned that he no longer was able to keep up with the needs of the children or enforce adequate boundaries for them. Data were collected through the use of conventional ethnographic field methods of participant and direct observation and formal and informal interviews. The FCC was evaluated using topics and items from an assessment tool used by the Oregon Child Welfare Study. Results: On the whole, the family was pleased with both the process and the outcome of the FCC. The FCC had provided a safe forum for the family to discuss issues that were difficult to discuss among themselves without a facilitator. Although the first plan developed by the family was not completely successful, there was sufficient change to provide some relief for the elder. The family requested and received a follow-up FCC to refine those parts of the first plan that were not working. Implications: The results of this project formed the foundation for its expansion. Continuation of this community-based participatory research project has included addressing the community's concern that, although elder mistreatment does exist within the community, it remains a hidden topic. Raising community awareness has included dissemination of the results of our preliminary work. Additionally, we have hired and trained three FCC facilitators from the community. The facilitators are beginning to take referrals for FCCs. Up to 15 FCCs will be conducted over the course of the next year to determine the feasibility of and implementation logistics for the sustainability of the project in the community. Future research efforts will include the development of a tool-kit that other tribal communities may use to implement a similar intervention with their people and the investigation of ways to sustain the intervention for interested tribal communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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