2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157429
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1111
Abstract:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1111
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Psychosocial Nursing
Title:Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Mail Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-3175
With an increasing number and proportion of international nurses joining the US registered nurse (RN) workforce, international nurses are playing an important role in providing care to Americans. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, internationally educated nurses constituted 3.5% of the estimated 2.9 million US RN workforce in 2004 (Health Resources and Services Administration, 2005). However, other studies (Aiken, Buchan, Sochalski, Nichols, & Powell, 2004; Polsky, Ross, Brush, & Sochalski, 2007) suggested much higher proportions ranging from 12-15.2%, depending on how "international nurse" was defined and what database and methods were used. This rising trend is also apparent at the state and local levels. According to a 2005 study conducted by the University of Nevada at Reno, 13.4% of Nevada's RNs are internationally educated and 15.6% of Southern Nevada (i.e. Clark County) nurses are foreign-trained. These figures did not take into consideration the estimated 10-15% under-reporting (T. Griswold, personal communication, June 1, 2007). This symposium provides a snapshot of the current profile of international nurses and describes their journey to become licensed in the US and their barriers in transition into their first job. What is the profile of international nurses working in the US based on the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) - How does their profile compare to that of their US counterparts? Are there any new characteristics of international nurses emerging from the 2004 NSSRN? These are the questions that the first paper in this symposium will address. What is the passage of international nurses who have deficiencies in such areas as the English language to successfully pass the NCLEX-RN and become licensed and gainfully employed in the US - How to develop a training program to facilitate this process? These are questions the second paper will focus on. Then what happen to international nurses after being hired? What are the barriers during their transition into a new and different US health care environment? Is there any consensus on the transitional barriers from preceptors, clinical educators, and international nurses themselves? These are the questions the third and last paper attempts to shed light on. Together, this symposium extends our understanding of international nurses working in the US. Findings from these papers have direct implications for nursing education, clinical practice, research, and national nurse workforce policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymposium Overview Abstract: Session 1111en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157429-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1111</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Xu, Yu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Psychosocial Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Mail Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-3175</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yu.xu@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With an increasing number and proportion of international nurses joining the US registered nurse (RN) workforce, international nurses are playing an important role in providing care to Americans. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, internationally educated nurses constituted 3.5% of the estimated 2.9 million US RN workforce in 2004 (Health Resources and Services Administration, 2005). However, other studies (Aiken, Buchan, Sochalski, Nichols, &amp; Powell, 2004; Polsky, Ross, Brush, &amp; Sochalski, 2007) suggested much higher proportions ranging from 12-15.2%, depending on how &quot;international nurse&quot; was defined and what database and methods were used. This rising trend is also apparent at the state and local levels. According to a 2005 study conducted by the University of Nevada at Reno, 13.4% of Nevada's RNs are internationally educated and 15.6% of Southern Nevada (i.e. Clark County) nurses are foreign-trained. These figures did not take into consideration the estimated 10-15% under-reporting (T. Griswold, personal communication, June 1, 2007). This symposium provides a snapshot of the current profile of international nurses and describes their journey to become licensed in the US and their barriers in transition into their first job. What is the profile of international nurses working in the US based on the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) - How does their profile compare to that of their US counterparts? Are there any new characteristics of international nurses emerging from the 2004 NSSRN? These are the questions that the first paper in this symposium will address. What is the passage of international nurses who have deficiencies in such areas as the English language to successfully pass the NCLEX-RN and become licensed and gainfully employed in the US - How to develop a training program to facilitate this process? These are questions the second paper will focus on. Then what happen to international nurses after being hired? What are the barriers during their transition into a new and different US health care environment? Is there any consensus on the transitional barriers from preceptors, clinical educators, and international nurses themselves? These are the questions the third and last paper attempts to shed light on. Together, this symposium extends our understanding of international nurses working in the US. Findings from these papers have direct implications for nursing education, clinical practice, research, and national nurse workforce policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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