Assessing Physical Function in the Elderly: Single Gait Speed or Comprehensive Exams?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157430
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Physical Function in the Elderly: Single Gait Speed or Comprehensive Exams?
Abstract:
Assessing Physical Function in the Elderly: Single Gait Speed or Comprehensive Exams?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Yu, Jie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Bakersfield, Department of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:9001 Stockdale Hwy, Science III, Rm 119, Bakersfield, CA, 93311, USA
Contact Telephone:661-654-2653
Background: An expanding aging population, which will represent 20% of the population by 2030, is one of the key factors impacting health care services. Specifically, functional deterioration among older adults is closely associated with crucial negative life events and significantly influences their quality of life. Accurate, simple and timely assessment of physical function is vital in promoting successful aging. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which the variable of gait speed correlates with the modified comprehensive physical function, which was measured by the combination of balance and sit-to-stand tests. Sample: Seventy subjects of 65 years old or above were enrolled from three independent living retirement communities in,. Using Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) as a cognitive function screening test, none was cognitive impaired. The mean age of the sample was 80 (SD=7.53, range: 65-97). The majority was female (68.6%), had at least a college degree (75.7%) and either married (44.3%) or widowed (45.7%). Methods: Data on three instruments (MMSE, SF-12 (Short Form Health Survey) and SPPB (Short Physical Performance Battery Test)) were extracted from a larger study examining the validity and inter rater reliability of seven functional instruments. The researcher investigated the relationship between gait speed and comprehensive functional assessments. Gait speed was assessed from a timed walk over an eight foot distance and comprehensive functional measurement consisted of balance and chair rise tests. Findings: The average gait speed was 2.35 ft/sec and ranged from 0.69 to 4.62 ft/sec. The mean score of the comprehensive functional assessment was 5.53 (SD=2.38, range: 0-8) with lower score representing poor functionality. The correlation between gait speed and modified comprehensive assessment of physical function was statistically significant (r=0.77, p<0.0001). Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that it is valid and feasible to use the single variable of gait speed as a surrogate measurement of comprehensive functional assessments. Elder care professionals should pay closely attention to gait speed and monitor its changes closely and routinely to provide elders with appropriate assessments of physical function.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Physical Function in the Elderly: Single Gait Speed or Comprehensive Exams?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157430-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Physical Function in the Elderly: Single Gait Speed or Comprehensive Exams?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Jie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Bakersfield, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9001 Stockdale Hwy, Science III, Rm 119, Bakersfield, CA, 93311, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">661-654-2653</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jyu3@csub.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: An expanding aging population, which will represent 20% of the population by 2030, is one of the key factors impacting health care services. Specifically, functional deterioration among older adults is closely associated with crucial negative life events and significantly influences their quality of life. Accurate, simple and timely assessment of physical function is vital in promoting successful aging. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which the variable of gait speed correlates with the modified comprehensive physical function, which was measured by the combination of balance and sit-to-stand tests. Sample: Seventy subjects of 65 years old or above were enrolled from three independent living retirement communities in,. Using Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) as a cognitive function screening test, none was cognitive impaired. The mean age of the sample was 80 (SD=7.53, range: 65-97). The majority was female (68.6%), had at least a college degree (75.7%) and either married (44.3%) or widowed (45.7%). Methods: Data on three instruments (MMSE, SF-12 (Short Form Health Survey) and SPPB (Short Physical Performance Battery Test)) were extracted from a larger study examining the validity and inter rater reliability of seven functional instruments. The researcher investigated the relationship between gait speed and comprehensive functional assessments. Gait speed was assessed from a timed walk over an eight foot distance and comprehensive functional measurement consisted of balance and chair rise tests. Findings: The average gait speed was 2.35 ft/sec and ranged from 0.69 to 4.62 ft/sec. The mean score of the comprehensive functional assessment was 5.53 (SD=2.38, range: 0-8) with lower score representing poor functionality. The correlation between gait speed and modified comprehensive assessment of physical function was statistically significant (r=0.77, p&lt;0.0001). Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that it is valid and feasible to use the single variable of gait speed as a surrogate measurement of comprehensive functional assessments. Elder care professionals should pay closely attention to gait speed and monitor its changes closely and routinely to provide elders with appropriate assessments of physical function.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:51:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:51:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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