2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157431
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1123
Abstract:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1123
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Yucha, Carolyn B., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing
Title:Dean and Professor
Contact Address:4505 S Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-5307
As nursing research has matured, nurse scientists have increased their repertoire of measurement tools. We are using more standardized paper and pencil scales and more external body sensors such as those used to measure skin conductance and skin elasticity (potential measures of body fluid balance). In addition, an ever growing range of laboratory tests are being used to measure a variety of cells, genes, proteins, and biomarkers. This symposium will focus on laboratory assays used in nursing research and some of the techniques that nurse researchers have recently added. These tools are important in re-engineering nursing research to meet the NIH Roadmap Initiative. In 2004, 55% of the 71 responding schools of nursing reported that faculty members had conducted research involving analysis of body fluids, tissues, cells, or any other physiological parameters within the last five years; 37% operated their own wet lab. These labs were equipped with a variety of analysis instruments: microscopes (84%), spectrophotometers (72%), and micro-plate readers suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (68%). Fewer than 20% had blood chemistry analyzers; blood gas analyzers; high-performance liquid chromatographers; gamma counters; and equipment for gel electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and genotyping. The most common analysis was salivary cortisol (done by 60%). Other analyses included hormone levels, immune protein, cell counts, catecholamines, chemistry, bacterial cultures in a variety of body fluids, as well as viral cultures and drug monitoring in blood. This symposium will provide information about cortisol and cytokine measures techniques as well as newer, more sophisticated and more expensive laboratory assays, such as proteomic techniques and leukocyte measurements within body tissues. Each presenter will provide the background and purpose or the measurement; describe the method, equipment required, and costs; and give some examples of its use in nursing research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymposium Overview Abstract: Session 1123en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157431-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1123</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yucha, Carolyn B., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-5307</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carolyn.yucha@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As nursing research has matured, nurse scientists have increased their repertoire of measurement tools. We are using more standardized paper and pencil scales and more external body sensors such as those used to measure skin conductance and skin elasticity (potential measures of body fluid balance). In addition, an ever growing range of laboratory tests are being used to measure a variety of cells, genes, proteins, and biomarkers. This symposium will focus on laboratory assays used in nursing research and some of the techniques that nurse researchers have recently added. These tools are important in re-engineering nursing research to meet the NIH Roadmap Initiative. In 2004, 55% of the 71 responding schools of nursing reported that faculty members had conducted research involving analysis of body fluids, tissues, cells, or any other physiological parameters within the last five years; 37% operated their own wet lab. These labs were equipped with a variety of analysis instruments: microscopes (84%), spectrophotometers (72%), and micro-plate readers suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (68%). Fewer than 20% had blood chemistry analyzers; blood gas analyzers; high-performance liquid chromatographers; gamma counters; and equipment for gel electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and genotyping. The most common analysis was salivary cortisol (done by 60%). Other analyses included hormone levels, immune protein, cell counts, catecholamines, chemistry, bacterial cultures in a variety of body fluids, as well as viral cultures and drug monitoring in blood. This symposium will provide information about cortisol and cytokine measures techniques as well as newer, more sophisticated and more expensive laboratory assays, such as proteomic techniques and leukocyte measurements within body tissues. Each presenter will provide the background and purpose or the measurement; describe the method, equipment required, and costs; and give some examples of its use in nursing research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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