2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157434
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examination Predictive Factors for Nutritional Status in Older Adults
Abstract:
Examination Predictive Factors for Nutritional Status in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:31 Snowy Lane, Red Lodge, MT, 59068, USA
Contact Telephone:406 671-2909
Physical change experienced by older persons may also account for nutritional problems.25 Teeth and mouth problems are increasingly common in elderly persons and may further limit food choices. As many as 91% of persons over age 85 have periodontal disease, which can make eating painful and lead to tooth loss.26 More than 26% of adults over 65 have dentures, which reduces their ability to chew food by 30-40% and if the dentures are loose fitting up to 85%.27 Problems with chewing means high protein items like meat that may be difficult to chew and these foods are eliminated from the diet. Furthermore, mouth and gum problems often go undetected as many elderly do not have regular dental visits.6 Normal peristalsis of the elderly person's gastrointestinal tract is reduced and may have a detrimental impact on absorption of macro- and micro-nutrients including vitamins and minerals. The basal metabolism rate decreases with age, meaning elderly persons require fewer calories for fuel and may gain weight without changing what they normally eat.25 This decreased caloric need can result in increased body weight but decreased muscle mass.28 Increased weight then leads to an increased risk of diabetes, may limit mobility, and exacerbate other existing chronic conditions.29 The purpose of this study is to examine which factors (sleep, depression, quality of life, and IADL) are most predictive of nutritional status in older adults. Data is presently being collected and will be completed by November 1, 2008. A sample size of 320-400 participants over age 65 years is anticipated. Senior and assisted living centers, hospital volunteer offices, and infusion centers have agreed to be data collection sites. Instruments include the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Missoula-Vitas Quality of Life, Instrumental Activities of daily Living Scale, and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). All have established reliability and validity and are recommended by the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing for use with an older population. Analysis will include descriptive demographic information. Individual tools and individual items from within those tools that were correlated at a <.10 level of significance with the MNA assessment nutritional risk will be entered into a step wise logistic regression analysis to look at predictors of nutritional status. Differences between groups with and without risk will be presented. Results from this study will help researchers and nurses focus on specific problems associated with nutritional status in an aging population. Future research may expand on predictive items and attempt to explain additional factors associated with nutritional status in older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamination Predictive Factors for Nutritional Status in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157434-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examination Predictive Factors for Nutritional Status in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">31 Snowy Lane, Red Lodge, MT, 59068, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406 671-2909</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenz@montana.edu, drkarenz@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical change experienced by older persons may also account for nutritional problems.25 Teeth and mouth problems are increasingly common in elderly persons and may further limit food choices. As many as 91% of persons over age 85 have periodontal disease, which can make eating painful and lead to tooth loss.26 More than 26% of adults over 65 have dentures, which reduces their ability to chew food by 30-40% and if the dentures are loose fitting up to 85%.27 Problems with chewing means high protein items like meat that may be difficult to chew and these foods are eliminated from the diet. Furthermore, mouth and gum problems often go undetected as many elderly do not have regular dental visits.6 Normal peristalsis of the elderly person's gastrointestinal tract is reduced and may have a detrimental impact on absorption of macro- and micro-nutrients including vitamins and minerals. The basal metabolism rate decreases with age, meaning elderly persons require fewer calories for fuel and may gain weight without changing what they normally eat.25 This decreased caloric need can result in increased body weight but decreased muscle mass.28 Increased weight then leads to an increased risk of diabetes, may limit mobility, and exacerbate other existing chronic conditions.29 The purpose of this study is to examine which factors (sleep, depression, quality of life, and IADL) are most predictive of nutritional status in older adults. Data is presently being collected and will be completed by November 1, 2008. A sample size of 320-400 participants over age 65 years is anticipated. Senior and assisted living centers, hospital volunteer offices, and infusion centers have agreed to be data collection sites. Instruments include the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Missoula-Vitas Quality of Life, Instrumental Activities of daily Living Scale, and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). All have established reliability and validity and are recommended by the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing for use with an older population. Analysis will include descriptive demographic information. Individual tools and individual items from within those tools that were correlated at a &lt;.10 level of significance with the MNA assessment nutritional risk will be entered into a step wise logistic regression analysis to look at predictors of nutritional status. Differences between groups with and without risk will be presented. Results from this study will help researchers and nurses focus on specific problems associated with nutritional status in an aging population. Future research may expand on predictive items and attempt to explain additional factors associated with nutritional status in older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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