2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157438
Type:
Presentation
Title:
COMPARING LEARNING OUTCOMES BETWEEN TWO EXPERIENTIAL TEACHING STRATEGIES
Abstract:
COMPARING LEARNING OUTCOMES BETWEEN TWO EXPERIENTIAL TEACHING STRATEGIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Adamson, Katie A., RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University Spokane
Title:Graduate Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:Nursing Building Room 243, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99202, USA
Co-Authors:Suzan Kardong-Edgren; Kenneth Daratha
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning outcomes between students who were exposed to two different experiential teaching strategies: human patient simulations (HPS) and case study clinical conferences (CCC).
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Experiential learning activities allow students to apply abstract concepts in realistic patient-care scenarios. Investigators are interested in comparing how CCC and HPS contribute to the goal of nursing education- to prepare nurses for practice. The knowledge, values and abilities that are essential to nursing practice require aptitude in the affective, cognitive and psychomotor domains. Therefore, research aimed at assessing the effectiveness of teaching strategies should address how they impact learning outcomes in each of these domains.
METHODS:
This pilot study used a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent comparison, Solomon four-group design. A total of 14 students participated in the study. Participants were exposed to either CCC or HPS learning activities. Cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning outcomes were measured and compared between groups.
RESULTS:
No significant differences in cognitive, affective or psychomotor learning outcomes were detected between the groups.
IMPLICATIONS:
There is much to be learned from the design, methods, analyses and RESULTS: of this study. As a pilot, this study tested the feasibility of coordinating and carrying out the complex study procedures. This pilot also provided a platform for testing the HPS and CCC activities and the evaluation tools. Post-test knowledge exam scores were used to complete a power-analysis which indicated that, to power the study at 80%, at the alpha = .05 level, a future replication of the study will require a total of 70 participants. Finally, the resources required for HPS learning activities are more costly than the resources required for CCC learning activities. Non-significant differences in learning outcomes between students who were exposed to one teaching strategy versus the other may provide a basis for future experiential teaching resource allocation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCOMPARING LEARNING OUTCOMES BETWEEN TWO EXPERIENTIAL TEACHING STRATEGIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157438-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">COMPARING LEARNING OUTCOMES BETWEEN TWO EXPERIENTIAL TEACHING STRATEGIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamson, Katie A., RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University Spokane</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Building Room 243, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaadamson@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzan Kardong-Edgren; Kenneth Daratha</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning outcomes between students who were exposed to two different experiential teaching strategies: human patient simulations (HPS) and case study clinical conferences (CCC). <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Experiential learning activities allow students to apply abstract concepts in realistic patient-care scenarios. Investigators are interested in comparing how CCC and HPS contribute to the goal of nursing education- to prepare nurses for practice. The knowledge, values and abilities that are essential to nursing practice require aptitude in the affective, cognitive and psychomotor domains. Therefore, research aimed at assessing the effectiveness of teaching strategies should address how they impact learning outcomes in each of these domains. <br/>METHODS: <br/>This pilot study used a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent comparison, Solomon four-group design. A total of 14 students participated in the study. Participants were exposed to either CCC or HPS learning activities. Cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning outcomes were measured and compared between groups. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>No significant differences in cognitive, affective or psychomotor learning outcomes were detected between the groups. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>There is much to be learned from the design, methods, analyses and RESULTS: of this study. As a pilot, this study tested the feasibility of coordinating and carrying out the complex study procedures. This pilot also provided a platform for testing the HPS and CCC activities and the evaluation tools. Post-test knowledge exam scores were used to complete a power-analysis which indicated that, to power the study at 80%, at the alpha = .05 level, a future replication of the study will require a total of 70 participants. Finally, the resources required for HPS learning activities are more costly than the resources required for CCC learning activities. Non-significant differences in learning outcomes between students who were exposed to one teaching strategy versus the other may provide a basis for future experiential teaching resource allocation.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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