2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157439
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EARLY ADOLESCENT DIETARY INTAKE AND HEALTH ASSOCIATIONS
Abstract:
EARLY ADOLESCENT DIETARY INTAKE AND HEALTH ASSOCIATIONS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Adamson, Katie, RN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Graduate Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:Nursing Building Room 335, P O Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the dietary intake of a sample of 7th graders enrolled in the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study, and 2) explore health, demographic and lifestyle indices associated with macro-nutrient intakes that were significantly out of the recommended range.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Healthy nutritional intake during early adolescence contributes to optimal growth and development. The nutritional intakes of children and adolescents in the United States are a growing public health concern. In order to design, implement and evaluate appropriate interventions for improving dietary intakes of adolescents, it is important to describe their dietary intakes and investigate health, demographic and lifestyle factors associated with nutritional intake out of recommended range.
METHODS:
A convenience sample of 7th grade students from 4 public middle schools were recruited and assessed as part of the TEAMS study. Data collected from 24-hour dietary recalls were entered into a nutritional analysis software program, Food Processor (EHSA, Oregon), to evaluate the nutritional intake of TEAMS research participants. SPSS 17.0 was used for analyses. Descriptive statistics addressed the first purpose of the study. Health (weight status, systolic BP, diastolic BP, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides), demographic (gender, free and reduced lunch status), and lifestyle (activity level) indices were dichotomized in order to explore indices associated with macro-nutrient intakes that were significantly out of recommended range.
RESULTS:
Diets of 173 students were analyzed (45% male, 55% female). More than 50% of studentsÆ intakes were below the recommended values in several micronutrients: calcium (79.5%), vitamin D (94.4%), vitamin A (82%), Vitamin C (55%), vitamin B6 (61%) and folate (72.7%). Seventy-seven percent of students' sodium intakes were above the recommended value. For macronutrients, most student' fat and carbohydrate intakes were within the recommended values. However, 61.5 percent of the students' protein intakes exceeded the recommended level by more than 10 percent. Male participants consumed significantly more protein and were more likely to consume protein in excess of the recommended intake for their height, weight and activity level.
IMPLICATIONS:
Adolescents' nutritional status has life-long health IMPLICATIONS: and researchers are continuing to document ways in which nutrition early in life influences the individual's risk for obesity, cardiovascular disease and diet-related cancers later in life. It is of concern that a significant number of micronutrients associated with health were consumed at deficient levels by the adolescents in this study. Further research is needed to explore factors that may be associated with consumption of protein that exceeds recommended intakes. Further, as protein consumption continues to rise in the United States, it is important investigate the health implications of this trend.

This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEARLY ADOLESCENT DIETARY INTAKE AND HEALTH ASSOCIATIONSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157439-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EARLY ADOLESCENT DIETARY INTAKE AND HEALTH ASSOCIATIONS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamson, Katie, RN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Building Room 335, P O Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaadamson@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the dietary intake of a sample of 7th graders enrolled in the Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study, and 2) explore health, demographic and lifestyle indices associated with macro-nutrient intakes that were significantly out of the recommended range. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Healthy nutritional intake during early adolescence contributes to optimal growth and development. The nutritional intakes of children and adolescents in the United States are a growing public health concern. In order to design, implement and evaluate appropriate interventions for improving dietary intakes of adolescents, it is important to describe their dietary intakes and investigate health, demographic and lifestyle factors associated with nutritional intake out of recommended range.<br/>METHODS: <br/>A convenience sample of 7th grade students from 4 public middle schools were recruited and assessed as part of the TEAMS study. Data collected from 24-hour dietary recalls were entered into a nutritional analysis software program, Food Processor (EHSA, Oregon), to evaluate the nutritional intake of TEAMS research participants. SPSS 17.0 was used for analyses. Descriptive statistics addressed the first purpose of the study. Health (weight status, systolic BP, diastolic BP, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides), demographic (gender, free and reduced lunch status), and lifestyle (activity level) indices were dichotomized in order to explore indices associated with macro-nutrient intakes that were significantly out of recommended range. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Diets of 173 students were analyzed (45% male, 55% female). More than 50% of students&AElig; intakes were below the recommended values in several micronutrients: calcium (79.5%), vitamin D (94.4%), vitamin A (82%), Vitamin C (55%), vitamin B6 (61%) and folate (72.7%). Seventy-seven percent of students' sodium intakes were above the recommended value. For macronutrients, most student' fat and carbohydrate intakes were within the recommended values. However, 61.5 percent of the students' protein intakes exceeded the recommended level by more than 10 percent. Male participants consumed significantly more protein and were more likely to consume protein in excess of the recommended intake for their height, weight and activity level.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Adolescents' nutritional status has life-long health IMPLICATIONS: and researchers are continuing to document ways in which nutrition early in life influences the individual's risk for obesity, cardiovascular disease and diet-related cancers later in life. It is of concern that a significant number of micronutrients associated with health were consumed at deficient levels by the adolescents in this study. Further research is needed to explore factors that may be associated with consumption of protein that exceeds recommended intakes. Further, as protein consumption continues to rise in the United States, it is important investigate the health implications of this trend.<br/> <br/>This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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