2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157440
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SOCIAL POSITIONING AS EXPERIENCED BY LATINO FATHERS DURING END-OF-LIFE CARE
Abstract:
SOCIAL POSITIONING AS EXPERIENCED BY LATINO FATHERS DURING END-OF-LIFE CARE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Africa, Deborah M., RN, MA, MPA
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:PhD Nursing Student, Betty Irene Moore Fellow
Contact Address:17317-B Lotus Way, Morgan Hill, CA, 95037, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: Discover relational processes within the interaction of Latino fathers experiencing end-of-life care for their child and the health care providers in an acute care setting Describe Latino fathers' perceptions of their interactions with health care providers. Identify those factors that helped or hindered Latino fathers' interactions with physicians and nurses. Analyze issues of health disparities against the backdrop of social positioning, power dynamics and oppression theory within the American healthcare culture.
BACKGROUND: Health disparities involve important issues of culture and power inequities. Power issues may be magnified when viewed through the lens of another culture. The extent to which end-of-life care is affected by health disparities among Latino families experiencing the death of a child has not been adequately addressed. Analysis of the interrelationships of health providers and patients/family members can offer valuable insights into "power" dynamics within the healthcare culture.
METHODS: Design: A descriptive, qualitative grounded theory design based on symbolic interactionism is used for a pilot study incorporating data obtained through a secondary analysis of Latino father interviews, provided by Dr. Betty Davies from her NIH study, Fathers Experience with Pediatric End- of-Life Care. Data Collection and Analysis: Using a Grounded Theory approach, data from 6 Latino interviews were coded, categorized, analyzed, and interpreted. Using constant comparative analysis, relationships emerged from the data that could lead to theory development.
SETTING: Fathers' experiences occurred in an acute care hospital. Interviews were conducted, usually in the father's home, within five years of the child's death.
RESULTS: This pilot study revealed perceptions and behaviors that mold and define the nature of social interactions between Latino fathers and health care providers. Negative interactions with health care providers, perceived by the fathers, resulted in focused, articulate descriptions of social positioning often reflected in terms of low self-esteem, characteristic of marginalized populations. However, a surprising preliminary finding surfaced in positive interactions with health care providers. Namely, fathers' perceptions described a collapsed hierarchy marked by a more egalitarian social interaction. When the fathers and individual health care providers had these positive interactions, fathers perceived feelings of symmetry, respect and trust.
IMPLICATIONS: While the findings are preliminary, they offer insight into the nature of the health care hierarchy as experienced by Latino fathers. If negative interactions enhance social differentiation and if positive communication and caring interaction can collapse a social hierarchy, temporarily or even perceptually, the nature of such interactions must be studied meticulously to further understand the power dynamics within the health care culture and its potential impact on care for all. This study can lead to greater understanding about the constructs of power dynamics within our health care culture and how those dynamics may impact the type and quality of care delivered. The focus on Latino fathers' experience may shed more light on the nature of health disparities in general.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSOCIAL POSITIONING AS EXPERIENCED BY LATINO FATHERS DURING END-OF-LIFE CAREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157440-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SOCIAL POSITIONING AS EXPERIENCED BY LATINO FATHERS DURING END-OF-LIFE CARE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Africa, Deborah M., RN, MA, MPA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Nursing Student, Betty Irene Moore Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">17317-B Lotus Way, Morgan Hill, CA, 95037, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborah.africa@ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: Discover relational processes within the interaction of Latino fathers experiencing end-of-life care for their child and the health care providers in an acute care setting Describe Latino fathers' perceptions of their interactions with health care providers. Identify those factors that helped or hindered Latino fathers' interactions with physicians and nurses. Analyze issues of health disparities against the backdrop of social positioning, power dynamics and oppression theory within the American healthcare culture.<br/> BACKGROUND: Health disparities involve important issues of culture and power inequities. Power issues may be magnified when viewed through the lens of another culture. The extent to which end-of-life care is affected by health disparities among Latino families experiencing the death of a child has not been adequately addressed. Analysis of the interrelationships of health providers and patients/family members can offer valuable insights into &quot;power&quot; dynamics within the healthcare culture.<br/> METHODS: Design: A descriptive, qualitative grounded theory design based on symbolic interactionism is used for a pilot study incorporating data obtained through a secondary analysis of Latino father interviews, provided by Dr. Betty Davies from her NIH study, Fathers Experience with Pediatric End- of-Life Care. Data Collection and Analysis: Using a Grounded Theory approach, data from 6 Latino interviews were coded, categorized, analyzed, and interpreted. Using constant comparative analysis, relationships emerged from the data that could lead to theory development. <br/>SETTING: Fathers' experiences occurred in an acute care hospital. Interviews were conducted, usually in the father's home, within five years of the child's death. <br/>RESULTS: This pilot study revealed perceptions and behaviors that mold and define the nature of social interactions between Latino fathers and health care providers. Negative interactions with health care providers, perceived by the fathers, resulted in focused, articulate descriptions of social positioning often reflected in terms of low self-esteem, characteristic of marginalized populations. However, a surprising preliminary finding surfaced in positive interactions with health care providers. Namely, fathers' perceptions described a collapsed hierarchy marked by a more egalitarian social interaction. When the fathers and individual health care providers had these positive interactions, fathers perceived feelings of symmetry, respect and trust. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: While the findings are preliminary, they offer insight into the nature of the health care hierarchy as experienced by Latino fathers. If negative interactions enhance social differentiation and if positive communication and caring interaction can collapse a social hierarchy, temporarily or even perceptually, the nature of such interactions must be studied meticulously to further understand the power dynamics within the health care culture and its potential impact on care for all. This study can lead to greater understanding about the constructs of power dynamics within our health care culture and how those dynamics may impact the type and quality of care delivered. The focus on Latino fathers' experience may shed more light on the nature of health disparities in general. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.