THE EFFECT OF A SLEEP PROGRAM IN REHAB CENTERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157443
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE EFFECT OF A SLEEP PROGRAM IN REHAB CENTERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENTS
Abstract:
THE EFFECT OF A SLEEP PROGRAM IN REHAB CENTERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Allen, Angela M., RN, BSN, MAT, EdS, EA, CRRN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Doctorate Student
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, MC 3020, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Co-Authors:Johannah Uriri-Glover
BACKGROUND: AlzheimerÆs disease (AD) accounts for approximately 69.9% of all dementia in the elderly population. Patients with AD often have nocturnally disrupted sleep. AD patients exhibit several types of disruptions, including an increase number of nighttime awakenings after falling asleep, lower sleep efficiency (percentage of time spent asleep in bed), increased daytime napping, changes in the amount of rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and increased latency to the first episode of REM sleep. Disruptive sleep, in AD patients, is strongly related to cognitive and functional decline and significantly increases the odds of nursing home placement. For older patients, with AD, rehabilitation is increasingly being provided outside the acute care setting in post-acute care facilities, such as nursing homes, skilled care facilities and rehabilitation centers. Once in a post-acute care facility, AD patients may receive treatment, such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, and many AD patients often nap during therapy or become too tired to complete therapy. Developing and training certified nursing assistants to implement an individualized sleep promotion program to help patients, with AD, sleep at night, may improve rehabilitation outcomes. The purpose of this presentation is present an overview of a proposed study.
SPECIFIC AIMS/QUESTIONS: The Specific Aims are: Aim 1: To assess the feasibility of the nursing assistant role in promoting sleep in persons with AD and increasing therapy performance by implementing an individualized program.; Aim 2: To obtain preliminary evidence of the efficacy of a sleep hygiene program on sleep outcomes in persons with dementia. The purpose of this proposed study is to develop and evaluate the feasibility of the training of certified nursing assistant to implement an individualized sleep promotion intervention for AD rehabilitation patients.
METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN: The research design for this proposed study will be a two group measure of pretest and posttest design, to obtain preliminary evidence about feasibility, safety, and efficacy of an individualized sleep promotion intervention. The study will include an intervention group and a control group.
SUBJECTS: The proposed sample will include forty rehabilitation patients diagnosed with AD and nursing assistants (n=8); four CNAs on working on the day shift and four CNAs working on the evening shift.
MEASUREMENT/ANALYSIS: Data will be analyzed using non-parametric statistics Wilcoxon Sign Test and Bonferroni correction will be used to control for Type I Error.
CONCLUSIONS: The study described will be submitted as a NRSA Grant proposal. Further studies will include efficacy and effectiveness of the proposed intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF A SLEEP PROGRAM IN REHAB CENTERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157443-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE EFFECT OF A SLEEP PROGRAM IN REHAB CENTERS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Angela M., RN, BSN, MAT, EdS, EA, CRRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctorate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, MC 3020, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Angela.M.Allen@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Johannah Uriri-Glover</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Alzheimer&AElig;s disease (AD) accounts for approximately 69.9% of all dementia in the elderly population. Patients with AD often have nocturnally disrupted sleep. AD patients exhibit several types of disruptions, including an increase number of nighttime awakenings after falling asleep, lower sleep efficiency (percentage of time spent asleep in bed), increased daytime napping, changes in the amount of rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and increased latency to the first episode of REM sleep. Disruptive sleep, in AD patients, is strongly related to cognitive and functional decline and significantly increases the odds of nursing home placement. For older patients, with AD, rehabilitation is increasingly being provided outside the acute care setting in post-acute care facilities, such as nursing homes, skilled care facilities and rehabilitation centers. Once in a post-acute care facility, AD patients may receive treatment, such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, and many AD patients often nap during therapy or become too tired to complete therapy. Developing and training certified nursing assistants to implement an individualized sleep promotion program to help patients, with AD, sleep at night, may improve rehabilitation outcomes. The purpose of this presentation is present an overview of a proposed study.<br/> SPECIFIC AIMS/QUESTIONS: The Specific Aims are: Aim 1: To assess the feasibility of the nursing assistant role in promoting sleep in persons with AD and increasing therapy performance by implementing an individualized program.; Aim 2: To obtain preliminary evidence of the efficacy of a sleep hygiene program on sleep outcomes in persons with dementia. The purpose of this proposed study is to develop and evaluate the feasibility of the training of certified nursing assistant to implement an individualized sleep promotion intervention for AD rehabilitation patients. <br/>METHODOLOGY AND DESIGN: The research design for this proposed study will be a two group measure of pretest and posttest design, to obtain preliminary evidence about feasibility, safety, and efficacy of an individualized sleep promotion intervention. The study will include an intervention group and a control group.<br/> SUBJECTS: The proposed sample will include forty rehabilitation patients diagnosed with AD and nursing assistants (n=8); four CNAs on working on the day shift and four CNAs working on the evening shift. <br/> MEASUREMENT/ANALYSIS: Data will be analyzed using non-parametric statistics Wilcoxon Sign Test and Bonferroni correction will be used to control for Type I Error. <br/> CONCLUSIONS: The study described will be submitted as a NRSA Grant proposal. Further studies will include efficacy and effectiveness of the proposed intervention.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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