8.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157447
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MEDICATION COMPLIANCE IN THE HOMELESS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Abstract:
MEDICATION COMPLIANCE IN THE HOMELESS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Banks, Angela D., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, CA, 94117-1080, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: To identify the impact of a video intervention on factors that influence compliance with anti-hypertensive medications in African Americans.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: African Americans have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the world, increasing their risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke.
METHODS: Using a pretest-post-test design, 40 men and women 50 (+/- 7) years of age, 60% male, and 65% single were enrolled at a community clinic in San Francisco. Data was collected August 2007 to June 2008. A structured interview guide consisting of 21 items on hypertension knowledge and beliefs was used. The Hill-Bone Compliance Scale was also used and consists of 14 items assessing patient behaviors in three domains of high blood pressure treatment. The three domains include reduced sodium intake, appointment keeping and taking medication. The differences in SBP and DBP were assessed using paired t-tests between those receiving intervention compared to those receiving usual care; gender differences in responses were also assessed.
RESULTS: There were no differences in compliance scores across age groups. For subjects receiving intervention, there were no differences observed in SBP, however there was a decrease in DBP (p= .02), compared to the control group. At baseline the compliance scores were higher for men than for women indicating that men were less compliant in taking their antihypertensive medications, (p= .01). No changes were observed in SBP by gender, but men had lower DBP compared to women at the 3-month follow-up, (p= .006).
IMPLICATIONS: In this sample of homeless African Americans diagnosed with hypertension, women were more compliant with taking anti-hypertensive medications compared to men. This is a critical new finding because prior research indicates that women are usually less compliant in taking antihypertensive medications compared to men, thereby increasing their risk for heart disease and stroke. Video intervention may be an important strategy for improving medication compliance and identifying the contributing factors but merits further research in homeless African American populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMEDICATION COMPLIANCE IN THE HOMELESS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157447-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">MEDICATION COMPLIANCE IN THE HOMELESS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks, Angela D., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, CA, 94117-1080, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">adb170@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: To identify the impact of a video intervention on factors that influence compliance with anti-hypertensive medications in African Americans. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: African Americans have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the world, increasing their risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke. <br/>METHODS: Using a pretest-post-test design, 40 men and women 50 (+/- 7) years of age, 60% male, and 65% single were enrolled at a community clinic in San Francisco. Data was collected August 2007 to June 2008. A structured interview guide consisting of 21 items on hypertension knowledge and beliefs was used. The Hill-Bone Compliance Scale was also used and consists of 14 items assessing patient behaviors in three domains of high blood pressure treatment. The three domains include reduced sodium intake, appointment keeping and taking medication. The differences in SBP and DBP were assessed using paired t-tests between those receiving intervention compared to those receiving usual care; gender differences in responses were also assessed. <br/>RESULTS: There were no differences in compliance scores across age groups. For subjects receiving intervention, there were no differences observed in SBP, however there was a decrease in DBP (p= .02), compared to the control group. At baseline the compliance scores were higher for men than for women indicating that men were less compliant in taking their antihypertensive medications, (p= .01). No changes were observed in SBP by gender, but men had lower DBP compared to women at the 3-month follow-up, (p= .006). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: In this sample of homeless African Americans diagnosed with hypertension, women were more compliant with taking anti-hypertensive medications compared to men. This is a critical new finding because prior research indicates that women are usually less compliant in taking antihypertensive medications compared to men, thereby increasing their risk for heart disease and stroke. Video intervention may be an important strategy for improving medication compliance and identifying the contributing factors but merits further research in homeless African American populations. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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