THE LINK BETWEEN CULTURE, FOOD HABITS, AND TYPE 2 DIABETES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE LINK BETWEEN CULTURE, FOOD HABITS, AND TYPE 2 DIABETES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
THE LINK BETWEEN CULTURE, FOOD HABITS, AND TYPE 2 DIABETES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Benavides-Vaello, Sandra, RN, MPAff., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: This presentation describes the findings from an ethnographic study that examined the interrelationship of food habits, culture, and type 2 diabetes among low income Mexican American women. The specific aims of the study were to: (1) explore the relationships between culture, food habits, and type 2 diabetes as experienced by low income Mexican American women; (2) examine the role of food in the cultural identity of low-income Mexican American women; (3) examine how trying to adhere to the ADA dietary guidelines for people with diabetes impacts the relationship between food and culture of low income Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes.

BACKGROUND: Much of the research surrounding diabetes and other chronic diseases is focused on the pathology or the biomedical aspects of such disorders, with less attention provided to sociocultural issues, such as food habits, that are also connected to these maladies. However, the sociolcultural aspects of illness do affect outcomes, and these constructs remain largely understudied, especially for low-income Mexican American women in rural South Texas.

METHODS: The method of inquiry employed for this study was ethnography. Purposeful sampling METHODS: were employed to identify the interviewees with diabetes. Sixteen low-income Mexican American women from Starr County, Texas were interviewed during this study.

RESULTS: Six themes were identified during the analysis of the data. Six themes were identified during the analysis of the data: (1) "la dieta," (2) the location and fluidity of food (3) confidence-defiance self-management connection, (4) negotiating sociocultural and biomedical expectations, (5) eating for diabetes is a family affair, and (6) strategies for self-care.

IMPLICATIONS: Clinical guidance that is deeply entrenched in the biomedical model should be reconsidered given that: 1) Moderation or balance was a key convention in this study group. Thus, the diabetes management plans formulated by the informants intersected at some points with the biomedical and cultural domains, and at times these domains were in tandem with one another, but balance remained an essential tenet. 2) "Good control" of one's diabetes was frequently described by actions rather than a single quantifiable event, such as a fasting blood sugar or other criteria more readily employed by clinicians. 3) All of the informants were aware that dietary changes were expected, and most had heard via different health providers (clinic, hospital, private practice) of the ADA guidelines for diabetes. All had made some modifications to existing foodways, but none were willing to expunge traditional foods from their repertoires. Finally, while difficult to articulate by the informants who alluded to this notion, the perception of being condemned by the biomedical community for maintaining cultural values was raised. When the biomedical community draws upon such tactics, consciously or unconsciously, for the sake of reducing diabetes or chronic disease morbidity, these machinations can backfire, and the ethics of such practices must be evaluated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE LINK BETWEEN CULTURE, FOOD HABITS, AND TYPE 2 DIABETES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE LINK BETWEEN CULTURE, FOOD HABITS, AND TYPE 2 DIABETES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benavides-Vaello, Sandra, RN, MPAff., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">svaello@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: This presentation describes the findings from an ethnographic study that examined the interrelationship of food habits, culture, and type 2 diabetes among low income Mexican American women. The specific aims of the study were to: (1) explore the relationships between culture, food habits, and type 2 diabetes as experienced by low income Mexican American women; (2) examine the role of food in the cultural identity of low-income Mexican American women; (3) examine how trying to adhere to the ADA dietary guidelines for people with diabetes impacts the relationship between food and culture of low income Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes.<br/> <br/>BACKGROUND: Much of the research surrounding diabetes and other chronic diseases is focused on the pathology or the biomedical aspects of such disorders, with less attention provided to sociocultural issues, such as food habits, that are also connected to these maladies. However, the sociolcultural aspects of illness do affect outcomes, and these constructs remain largely understudied, especially for low-income Mexican American women in rural South Texas. <br/> <br/>METHODS: The method of inquiry employed for this study was ethnography. Purposeful sampling METHODS: were employed to identify the interviewees with diabetes. Sixteen low-income Mexican American women from Starr County, Texas were interviewed during this study. <br/> <br/>RESULTS: Six themes were identified during the analysis of the data. Six themes were identified during the analysis of the data: (1) &quot;la dieta,&quot; (2) the location and fluidity of food (3) confidence-defiance self-management connection, (4) negotiating sociocultural and biomedical expectations, (5) eating for diabetes is a family affair, and (6) strategies for self-care.<br/> <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Clinical guidance that is deeply entrenched in the biomedical model should be reconsidered given that: 1) Moderation or balance was a key convention in this study group. Thus, the diabetes management plans formulated by the informants intersected at some points with the biomedical and cultural domains, and at times these domains were in tandem with one another, but balance remained an essential tenet. 2) &quot;Good control&quot; of one's diabetes was frequently described by actions rather than a single quantifiable event, such as a fasting blood sugar or other criteria more readily employed by clinicians. 3) All of the informants were aware that dietary changes were expected, and most had heard via different health providers (clinic, hospital, private practice) of the ADA guidelines for diabetes. All had made some modifications to existing foodways, but none were willing to expunge traditional foods from their repertoires. Finally, while difficult to articulate by the informants who alluded to this notion, the perception of being condemned by the biomedical community for maintaining cultural values was raised. When the biomedical community draws upon such tactics, consciously or unconsciously, for the sake of reducing diabetes or chronic disease morbidity, these machinations can backfire, and the ethics of such practices must be evaluated. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:52:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:52:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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