2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157452
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RESILIENCE IN FRONTIER GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN
Abstract:
RESILIENCE IN FRONTIER GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bigbee, Jeri, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Boise State University
Title:Jody DeMeyer Endowed Chair
Contact Address:1910 University Dr., Boise, ID, 83725, USA
Co-Authors:Molly Prengaman; Barbie Vander Boegh; Harriet Shaklee
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess resilience in frontier caregiving grandparents.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: With grandparents increasingly serving as the safety net for children in their families, promoting the health of caregiving grandparents is critical. Research specifically addressing the health of the growing number of rural and frontier caregiving grandparents has been extremely limited. Adult resilience theory along with PenderÆs Health Promotion Model served as the conceptual framework for the study. Resilience is defined as a personality characteristic that moderates the negative effects of stress and promotes adaptation. To date, this theory has not been applied to caregiving grandparents.
METHODS: A pilot descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 11 caregiving grandparents residing in a frontier county in Idaho. The sample included five grandfathers and six grandmothers with a mean age of 60.5 years (range = 46-75). Six of the grandparents were full-time custodial caregivers and 5 were ôco-parentingö with their children. The 25-item Resilience Scale, was administered to the sample along with the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) and the SF-36 Health Survey for comparison. Nonparametric descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted.
RESULTS: The internal consistency reliability of the Resilience Scale in this study was strong (alpha coefficient = .93), consistent with previous studies. Mean resilience scores were in the moderate range based on established adult norms, with a mean of 147 (SD = 19.7) and a range of 106-172. This mean score was higher than that found in previous research with rural/frontier residents. Resilience scores were not significantly related to age, gender, HPLPII, or SF-36 scores.
IMPLICATIONS: These findings suggest that frontier grandparents raising grandchildren demonstrate moderate levels of resilience, which may be critical in their coping with their challenging family situations. However, these data also suggest that resilience levels may be unrelated to age, gender, health promotion behaviors, or health status in this population, in contrast with previous research with other adult populations. This pilot study was limited by the small sample from a single frontier county. Further research with larger samples is indicated to more fully assess the concept of resilience as related to grandparents raising grandchildren, particularly those living in rural and frontier areas, to guide future nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRESILIENCE IN FRONTIER GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDRENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157452-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RESILIENCE IN FRONTIER GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bigbee, Jeri, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boise State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Jody DeMeyer Endowed Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 University Dr., Boise, ID, 83725, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeribigbee@boisestate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Molly Prengaman; Barbie Vander Boegh; Harriet Shaklee</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess resilience in frontier caregiving grandparents. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: With grandparents increasingly serving as the safety net for children in their families, promoting the health of caregiving grandparents is critical. Research specifically addressing the health of the growing number of rural and frontier caregiving grandparents has been extremely limited. Adult resilience theory along with Pender&AElig;s Health Promotion Model served as the conceptual framework for the study. Resilience is defined as a personality characteristic that moderates the negative effects of stress and promotes adaptation. To date, this theory has not been applied to caregiving grandparents. <br/>METHODS: A pilot descriptive study was conducted with a convenience sample of 11 caregiving grandparents residing in a frontier county in Idaho. The sample included five grandfathers and six grandmothers with a mean age of 60.5 years (range = 46-75). Six of the grandparents were full-time custodial caregivers and 5 were &ocirc;co-parenting&ouml; with their children. The 25-item Resilience Scale, was administered to the sample along with the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLPII) and the SF-36 Health Survey for comparison. Nonparametric descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted. <br/>RESULTS: The internal consistency reliability of the Resilience Scale in this study was strong (alpha coefficient = .93), consistent with previous studies. Mean resilience scores were in the moderate range based on established adult norms, with a mean of 147 (SD = 19.7) and a range of 106-172. This mean score was higher than that found in previous research with rural/frontier residents. Resilience scores were not significantly related to age, gender, HPLPII, or SF-36 scores. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: These findings suggest that frontier grandparents raising grandchildren demonstrate moderate levels of resilience, which may be critical in their coping with their challenging family situations. However, these data also suggest that resilience levels may be unrelated to age, gender, health promotion behaviors, or health status in this population, in contrast with previous research with other adult populations. This pilot study was limited by the small sample from a single frontier county. Further research with larger samples is indicated to more fully assess the concept of resilience as related to grandparents raising grandchildren, particularly those living in rural and frontier areas, to guide future nursing interventions.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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