2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157453
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADOLESCENT CARDIOMETABOLIC CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Abstract:
ADOLESCENT CARDIOMETABOLIC CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bindler, Ruth, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The aims of this study, which is part of the larger Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in School (TEAMS) project, were to: 1) describe selected demographic, anthropometric and laboratory values of TEAMS middle school students, 2) contrast differences in rates of cardiometabolic markers in early adolescence for youth at or above the 95th percentile for body mass index (BMI) with those below the 95th percentile, 3) examine rates of exceeding cardiometabolic cut-off points by weight status, and 4) predict the odds ratio of manifesting one of more cardiometabolic outcomes for adolescents with obesity.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Child and adolescent obesity and overweight prevalence have increased alarmingly in the last three decades. Nearly 1/3 of youth now have a BMI over the 85th percentile. Excess weight in childhood is a major health concern, associated with adult obesity, as well as increased cardiometabolic risk and chronic health problems in both childhood and into adulthood. While studies have identified relationships of BMI with cardiometabolic risk, the predictive ability of BMI in early adolescence has not previously been quantified.
METHODS:
Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Anthropometric measurements were taken, including height, weight, and waist circumference. BMI and Waist to Height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were measured following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols. Serum biomarkers were obtained from a fasting blood draw.
RESULTS:
Participants included middle school students (N = 153, 56% female, 44% male) with ages ranging from 11-15 years (Mage = 12.6 years, SD = 0.47). Mean BMI was 22.34 and mean BMI percentile was 70.87. Youth at or above the 95th percentile for BMI were significantly more likely (p=<.01) to have low HDL-C, and elevated triglycerides, BP, WHtR, and HOMA-IR (homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance). Youth at or above the 95th percentile for BMI were nearly 8 times more likely to have one cardiometabolic risk factor than those in other BMI percentile groups.
IMPLICATIONS:
Exceeding the 95th percentile for BMI significantly increases the likelihood of having cardiometabolic risk factors, such as low HDL-C, and elevated triglycerides, HOMA-IR, and BP. Findings are pertinent to health care settings since providers can view BMI percentile as an excellent reflection of cardiometabolic status and the youth's likelihood for future chronic disease. Interventions can then be implemented to intervene with youths and their families.
This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADOLESCENT CARDIOMETABOLIC CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157453-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ADOLESCENT CARDIOMETABOLIC CHARACTERISTICS IN THE TEAMS PROJECT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bindler, Ruth, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bindler@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>The aims of this study, which is part of the larger Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in School (TEAMS) project, were to: 1) describe selected demographic, anthropometric and laboratory values of TEAMS middle school students, 2) contrast differences in rates of cardiometabolic markers in early adolescence for youth at or above the 95th percentile for body mass index (BMI) with those below the 95th percentile, 3) examine rates of exceeding cardiometabolic cut-off points by weight status, and 4) predict the odds ratio of manifesting one of more cardiometabolic outcomes for adolescents with obesity. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Child and adolescent obesity and overweight prevalence have increased alarmingly in the last three decades. Nearly 1/3 of youth now have a BMI over the 85th percentile. Excess weight in childhood is a major health concern, associated with adult obesity, as well as increased cardiometabolic risk and chronic health problems in both childhood and into adulthood. While studies have identified relationships of BMI with cardiometabolic risk, the predictive ability of BMI in early adolescence has not previously been quantified. <br/>METHODS: <br/>Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Anthropometric measurements were taken, including height, weight, and waist circumference. BMI and Waist to Height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were measured following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocols. Serum biomarkers were obtained from a fasting blood draw. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Participants included middle school students (N = 153, 56% female, 44% male) with ages ranging from 11-15 years (Mage = 12.6 years, SD = 0.47). Mean BMI was 22.34 and mean BMI percentile was 70.87. Youth at or above the 95th percentile for BMI were significantly more likely (p=&lt;.01) to have low HDL-C, and elevated triglycerides, BP, WHtR, and HOMA-IR (homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance). Youth at or above the 95th percentile for BMI were nearly 8 times more likely to have one cardiometabolic risk factor than those in other BMI percentile groups. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Exceeding the 95th percentile for BMI significantly increases the likelihood of having cardiometabolic risk factors, such as low HDL-C, and elevated triglycerides, HOMA-IR, and BP. Findings are pertinent to health care settings since providers can view BMI percentile as an excellent reflection of cardiometabolic status and the youth's likelihood for future chronic disease. Interventions can then be implemented to intervene with youths and their families. <br/> This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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