2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SNEEZING ON A JET PLANE: AIR TRAVEL DURING A SWINE FLU EPIDEMIC
Abstract:
SNEEZING ON A JET PLANE: AIR TRAVEL DURING A SWINE FLU EPIDEMIC
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Blaz, Jacquelyn W., MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA
PURPOSE: Much has been written about the economic and political impacts of air travel during flu epidemics. Little can be found, however, about the experience of air travelers during a flu epidemic when drastic measures are in effect. This pilot study attempts to address this absence in the literature.
BACKGROUND: A phenomenological approach was selected for this study in order to describe the experience of traveling by airplane between the United States of America to another country during the recent H1N1 flu epidemic. Interviewing travelers and asking them to retell their experiences would be the standard way to gain a phenomenological description of their experience. However, because time and monetary resources were limited in this pilot study, weblog, or "blog," posts were analyzed instead of in person interviews. The personal telling of experiences, and the public nature of blogs, makes them a good substitute for personal interviews in a phenomenological study.
METHODS: The terms searched were "air travel," "blog," and "H1N1 OR Swine flu." The first ten hits were examined for inclusion in the study. To be included in the study, the post had to be a blog post written about a personal experience traveling by airplane between the United States and another country. The travel experience had to have taken place after the knowledge of the H1N1 flu outbreak in Mexico was public (approximately April 15th, 2009). Blog posts discussing travel in a general manner that did not describe a personal experience were not included in the analysis. Of the ten initial hits found using the Google search engine, two posts were determined to fit the inclusion criteria. Each of these two blog posts was qualitatively coded and analyzed for themes.
RESULTS: Two themes arose from the analysis of the blog posts. The first was labeled "Americans as Self and Other." This theme was characterized by statements highlighting how travelers from America experienced different precautions than travelers from other countries. This experience seemed to move the traveler from a centered position to a position of outsider, or "other." The second theme was labeled "Capture and Isolation." This theme was characterized by statements of fear surrounding capture, being isolated, and potential contamination. Words such as "alien," "pariah," and "leper" were used to describe individuals suspected of carrying the H1N1 flu virus.
IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the feelings of alienation and isolation experienced by American travelers during the onset of a new influenza epidemic. This study illuminates a manifestation of cultural stigmatization associated with an emergent disease that is rarely experienced by Americans. Examining the experiences of American travelers stigmatized by their association with the H1N1 virus can provide a rare glimpse into the experience of "other" through the eyes of individuals who have experiences only as "center" or "self." By understanding these experiences, nurses can increase their cultural competency in practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSNEEZING ON A JET PLANE: AIR TRAVEL DURING A SWINE FLU EPIDEMICen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SNEEZING ON A JET PLANE: AIR TRAVEL DURING A SWINE FLU EPIDEMIC</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blaz, Jacquelyn W., MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jacquee.Blaz@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Much has been written about the economic and political impacts of air travel during flu epidemics. Little can be found, however, about the experience of air travelers during a flu epidemic when drastic measures are in effect. This pilot study attempts to address this absence in the literature.<br/>BACKGROUND: A phenomenological approach was selected for this study in order to describe the experience of traveling by airplane between the United States of America to another country during the recent H1N1 flu epidemic. Interviewing travelers and asking them to retell their experiences would be the standard way to gain a phenomenological description of their experience. However, because time and monetary resources were limited in this pilot study, weblog, or &quot;blog,&quot; posts were analyzed instead of in person interviews. The personal telling of experiences, and the public nature of blogs, makes them a good substitute for personal interviews in a phenomenological study. <br/>METHODS: The terms searched were &quot;air travel,&quot; &quot;blog,&quot; and &quot;H1N1 OR Swine flu.&quot; The first ten hits were examined for inclusion in the study. To be included in the study, the post had to be a blog post written about a personal experience traveling by airplane between the United States and another country. The travel experience had to have taken place after the knowledge of the H1N1 flu outbreak in Mexico was public (approximately April 15th, 2009). Blog posts discussing travel in a general manner that did not describe a personal experience were not included in the analysis. Of the ten initial hits found using the Google search engine, two posts were determined to fit the inclusion criteria. Each of these two blog posts was qualitatively coded and analyzed for themes. <br/>RESULTS: Two themes arose from the analysis of the blog posts. The first was labeled &quot;Americans as Self and Other.&quot; This theme was characterized by statements highlighting how travelers from America experienced different precautions than travelers from other countries. This experience seemed to move the traveler from a centered position to a position of outsider, or &quot;other.&quot; The second theme was labeled &quot;Capture and Isolation.&quot; This theme was characterized by statements of fear surrounding capture, being isolated, and potential contamination. Words such as &quot;alien,&quot; &quot;pariah,&quot; and &quot;leper&quot; were used to describe individuals suspected of carrying the H1N1 flu virus. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the feelings of alienation and isolation experienced by American travelers during the onset of a new influenza epidemic. This study illuminates a manifestation of cultural stigmatization associated with an emergent disease that is rarely experienced by Americans. Examining the experiences of American travelers stigmatized by their association with the H1N1 virus can provide a rare glimpse into the experience of &quot;other&quot; through the eyes of individuals who have experiences only as &quot;center&quot; or &quot;self.&quot; By understanding these experiences, nurses can increase their cultural competency in practice.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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