2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157457
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INITIATION INTO METHAMPHETAMINE USE IN RURAL USA
Abstract:
INITIATION INTO METHAMPHETAMINE USE IN RURAL USA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bowen, Anne M., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:U. Wyoming
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA
Co-Authors:John Moring; Candice Daniel
The methamphetamine (MA) epidemic has spread from the urban areas of the western United States to rural areas in the West, South, and Midwest. Data on methamphetamine and other drug use for rural areas is scarce, but what is available suggests significant problems. In the frontier areas of Montana and Wyoming, MA abuse has spread through farms and ranches and among Native Americans. Wyoming's high school students have the 2nd highest rate of lifetime MA use and the 3rd highest rate of lifetime MA injection in the U.S. In 2003, 11.6% of high school students in Wyoming had used methamphetamine at least once in their lifetimes compared to a nationwide median of 7.5% (CDC, 2004). The high rates of drug use and risky sexual behavior among youth suggests that identifying factors that relate to the early initiation of methamphetamine use are important.
In this study we utilized BronfenbrennerÆs bio-ecological model (1977, 2000) as a framework for identifying contextual factors that contribute to the initiation of methamphetamine use. Between June 2007 and June 2009, 80 rural methamphetamine users participated in 1 to 2 hour qualitative interviews. Interviews were transcribed and coded for factors that surrounded initiation into methamphetamine use based on the bio-ecological model. Contexts of initiation were coded according to family, peers, work, community, and individual issues. Hierarchical clustering based on reasons for initiation yielded 4 clusters: two younger groups (average age of initiation was 18) who report either family or peers as their primary motivation for starting meth use, a slightly older group (mean age of initiation was 21) who report a combination of family and peers and the oldest group (mean age of initiation = 25) who reported work and school factors as primary motivators of initiation. Themes related to starting meth use included coping with psychosocial problems (weight loss and body dissatisfaction), work and household duties, depression, stressful home environments, previous alcohol and drug use and social pressure. Unlike studies of urban meth users, the strong association between younger age and family mediated initiation into meth use is unique.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINITIATION INTO METHAMPHETAMINE USE IN RURAL USAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157457-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">INITIATION INTO METHAMPHETAMINE USE IN RURAL USA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowen, Anne M., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U. Wyoming</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abowen@uwyo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John Moring; Candice Daniel</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> The methamphetamine (MA) epidemic has spread from the urban areas of the western United States to rural areas in the West, South, and Midwest. Data on methamphetamine and other drug use for rural areas is scarce, but what is available suggests significant problems. In the frontier areas of Montana and Wyoming, MA abuse has spread through farms and ranches and among Native Americans. Wyoming's high school students have the 2nd highest rate of lifetime MA use and the 3rd highest rate of lifetime MA injection in the U.S. In 2003, 11.6% of high school students in Wyoming had used methamphetamine at least once in their lifetimes compared to a nationwide median of 7.5% (CDC, 2004). The high rates of drug use and risky sexual behavior among youth suggests that identifying factors that relate to the early initiation of methamphetamine use are important.<br/>In this study we utilized Bronfenbrenner&AElig;s bio-ecological model (1977, 2000) as a framework for identifying contextual factors that contribute to the initiation of methamphetamine use. Between June 2007 and June 2009, 80 rural methamphetamine users participated in 1 to 2 hour qualitative interviews. Interviews were transcribed and coded for factors that surrounded initiation into methamphetamine use based on the bio-ecological model. Contexts of initiation were coded according to family, peers, work, community, and individual issues. Hierarchical clustering based on reasons for initiation yielded 4 clusters: two younger groups (average age of initiation was 18) who report either family or peers as their primary motivation for starting meth use, a slightly older group (mean age of initiation was 21) who report a combination of family and peers and the oldest group (mean age of initiation = 25) who reported work and school factors as primary motivators of initiation. Themes related to starting meth use included coping with psychosocial problems (weight loss and body dissatisfaction), work and household duties, depression, stressful home environments, previous alcohol and drug use and social pressure. Unlike studies of urban meth users, the strong association between younger age and family mediated initiation into meth use is unique. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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