2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157458
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SIBLING VIOLENCE RESEARCH, PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION, SILENCE AND CONSEQUENCES
Abstract:
SIBLING VIOLENCE RESEARCH, PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION, SILENCE AND CONSEQUENCES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bowie, Bonnie H., PhD, MBA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122, USA
Co-Authors:Debby A. Phillips; Dorothy Chao; Kelly Yukevich
PURPOSE: The specific aim of this study was to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of sibling violence in an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric sample population, including prevalence, demographics, and associated diagnoses.
BACKGROUND: There is a dearth of research on sibling violence; even though the small amount of research that has been done on sibling violence shows that it is the most prevalent form of violence occurring within the family (Gelles and Straus, 1988; Straus & Gelles, 1990). Describing a number of presumptions about societiesÆ acceptance of "child-on-child" violence, Finkelhor, Turner, & Ormrod (2006) challenge the conclusion the National Crime Survey analysis that child victimizations are not as serious as those of adults. Acts of aggression toward family members are common in children diagnosed with a mental illness, yet practitioners do not routinely screen families for sibling violence.
METHODS: Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review of all patients between 5 and 12 years old admitted to a psychiatric hospital during 2007 was performed. Data on patient demographics and AXIX I diagnosis was collected. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the prevalence of sibling violence. Language used by clinicians and others to describe sibling violence were recorded verbatim and discourse analysis methods were used to explore ways of constituting sibling violence.
RESULTS: 76% of the children with siblings (N=135) were found to be perpetrators of violence against their siblings. Most of the perpetrators were boys (80.1%) and sibling victims were more likely to be girls. The two most common AXIS I psychiatric diagnoses were Oppositional Defiant Disorder (63.7%) and Mood Disorder (48.1%), neither of which have acting violently as a diagnostic criteria. 34.8 % of the children perpetrating sibling violence were diagnosed with Intermittent Explosive Disorder which has acting violently against people and property as one of the criteria. Discourse analysis showed that the most common language used to describe sibling violence was aggression and threats. Aggression signified acts such as grabbing, tripping, twisting sibling's arm, stabbing with a pen, and chasing with a knife. Threaten signified threats such as, threatening to kill brother or sister, threatening to stab sister, threatening to chop up brother, and threatening to hurt sister/brother. The language constituting violence perpetrated by siblings as serious was coincidental in some of the same charts with sibling violence constituted as regular brothers fighting, fairly typical sibling relationship, average sibling relationships, and little more than normal rivalry.
IMPLICATIONS: Nursing needs to be on the frontlines of ending all practices of violence. Recognizing sibling violence as a practice of violence that warrants attention is part of this work. Prevention and intervention will follow such recognition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSIBLING VIOLENCE RESEARCH, PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION, SILENCE AND CONSEQUENCESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157458-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SIBLING VIOLENCE RESEARCH, PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION, SILENCE AND CONSEQUENCES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowie, Bonnie H., PhD, MBA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bowieb@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debby A. Phillips; Dorothy Chao; Kelly Yukevich</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The specific aim of this study was to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of sibling violence in an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric sample population, including prevalence, demographics, and associated diagnoses. <br/>BACKGROUND: There is a dearth of research on sibling violence; even though the small amount of research that has been done on sibling violence shows that it is the most prevalent form of violence occurring within the family (Gelles and Straus, 1988; Straus &amp; Gelles, 1990). Describing a number of presumptions about societies&AElig; acceptance of &quot;child-on-child&quot; violence, Finkelhor, Turner, &amp; Ormrod (2006) challenge the conclusion the National Crime Survey analysis that child victimizations are not as serious as those of adults. Acts of aggression toward family members are common in children diagnosed with a mental illness, yet practitioners do not routinely screen families for sibling violence.<br/>METHODS: Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review of all patients between 5 and 12 years old admitted to a psychiatric hospital during 2007 was performed. Data on patient demographics and AXIX I diagnosis was collected. Descriptive statistics were used to identify the prevalence of sibling violence. Language used by clinicians and others to describe sibling violence were recorded verbatim and discourse analysis methods were used to explore ways of constituting sibling violence. <br/>RESULTS: 76% of the children with siblings (N=135) were found to be perpetrators of violence against their siblings. Most of the perpetrators were boys (80.1%) and sibling victims were more likely to be girls. The two most common AXIS I psychiatric diagnoses were Oppositional Defiant Disorder (63.7%) and Mood Disorder (48.1%), neither of which have acting violently as a diagnostic criteria. 34.8 % of the children perpetrating sibling violence were diagnosed with Intermittent Explosive Disorder which has acting violently against people and property as one of the criteria. Discourse analysis showed that the most common language used to describe sibling violence was aggression and threats. Aggression signified acts such as grabbing, tripping, twisting sibling's arm, stabbing with a pen, and chasing with a knife. Threaten signified threats such as, threatening to kill brother or sister, threatening to stab sister, threatening to chop up brother, and threatening to hurt sister/brother. The language constituting violence perpetrated by siblings as serious was coincidental in some of the same charts with sibling violence constituted as regular brothers fighting, fairly typical sibling relationship, average sibling relationships, and little more than normal rivalry.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Nursing needs to be on the frontlines of ending all practices of violence. Recognizing sibling violence as a practice of violence that warrants attention is part of this work. Prevention and intervention will follow such recognition. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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