2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SHEDDING LIGHT ON NURSE-TO-NURSE CONFLICT
Abstract:
SHEDDING LIGHT ON NURSE-TO-NURSE CONFLICT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bowles, Cheryl, EdD, RN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Professor
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Co-Authors:Lori Candela
PURPOSES/AIMS: To better understand the frequency, types, severity and effects of nurse-to-nurse conflict.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The literature describes nurse abuse from patients, family members, physicians and frequently from other nurses. Abuse is usually verbal or nonverbal. The work environments where abuse occurs are known to contribute to worker stress, turnover and the overall nursing shortage. This ultimately affects patient care. Today, national healthcare organizations acknowledge the need for development of a 'culture of safety' concerning conflict in the work environment. Still, little attention has been focused on understanding nurse-to-nurse conflict.
METHODS: The Verbal Abuse Scale (VAS), developed by Manderino and Banton, was modified to reflect verbal abuse of nurses by other nurses. The VAS is a Likert-type scale with 65 seven-point items consisting of eight subscales. Although the title of the VAS indicates measurement of verbal abuse, it also measures nonverbal abuse in addition to responses to the abusive experiences. Following IRB approval, a random sample of 2500 Nevada Nurses were mailed invitations to participate in the electronic survey. In addition, flyers were distributed to RN's at 5 large hospitals in northern and southern Nevada.
RESULTS: 254 predominantly female (89%) Nevada RN's who were 40-59 (52%) and 20-39 (40%) years old completed the online survey. Most nurses had less than 5 years (32%) or over 20 years (33%) of practice experience in the hospital setting (67%). Staff nurses were the main source of verbal abuse (63%) with charge nurses (20%) and nurse supervisors (17%) also identified. Nurses identified predominant factors contributing to verbal abuse as high stress situations (70%) inadequate staffing (57%) administrative time and productivity pressures (52%) competence of the nurse (45). Verbal abuse was personally experienced by approximately 200 of these nurses several times a year (65%), more than monthly (20%) and once a week or more (13%). The most frequent types of verbal abuse reported include, abusive anger, judging-criticizing, accusing-blaming, blocking-diverting, abuse as jokes, discounting, trivializing, ignoring, and condescending with abusive anger, judging-criticizing, ignoring, and condescending as the most stressful to experience. Thirty five or 14% indicated they had left a nursing position because of verbal abuse from other nurses. Statements by nurses who experienced abusive situations include: "Nurses that are verbally abusive, not helpful and nurturing, are poison." "It is a sorry state of affairs when an employee has no recourse but to resign a position she liked."
IMPLICATIONS: RESULTS: suggest that interpersonal conflict among nurses is occurring; affecting nurses and the care they provide. The literature indicates that patient safety is directly linked to staff conflicts and this unhealthy environment is likely a contributor to difficulties for health care facilities in recruiting and retaining staff nurses. Interventions such as interpersonal conflict educational programs must be designed and implemented for practicing nurses as well as developing and including this content in basic nursing education curricula. Limitations include the small sample size plus complexity and length of the VAS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSHEDDING LIGHT ON NURSE-TO-NURSE CONFLICTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SHEDDING LIGHT ON NURSE-TO-NURSE CONFLICT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowles, Cheryl, EdD, RN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cheryl.bowles@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lori Candela</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: To better understand the frequency, types, severity and effects of nurse-to-nurse conflict.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The literature describes nurse abuse from patients, family members, physicians and frequently from other nurses. Abuse is usually verbal or nonverbal. The work environments where abuse occurs are known to contribute to worker stress, turnover and the overall nursing shortage. This ultimately affects patient care. Today, national healthcare organizations acknowledge the need for development of a 'culture of safety' concerning conflict in the work environment. Still, little attention has been focused on understanding nurse-to-nurse conflict. <br/>METHODS: The Verbal Abuse Scale (VAS), developed by Manderino and Banton, was modified to reflect verbal abuse of nurses by other nurses. The VAS is a Likert-type scale with 65 seven-point items consisting of eight subscales. Although the title of the VAS indicates measurement of verbal abuse, it also measures nonverbal abuse in addition to responses to the abusive experiences. Following IRB approval, a random sample of 2500 Nevada Nurses were mailed invitations to participate in the electronic survey. In addition, flyers were distributed to RN's at 5 large hospitals in northern and southern Nevada.<br/>RESULTS: 254 predominantly female (89%) Nevada RN's who were 40-59 (52%) and 20-39 (40%) years old completed the online survey. Most nurses had less than 5 years (32%) or over 20 years (33%) of practice experience in the hospital setting (67%). Staff nurses were the main source of verbal abuse (63%) with charge nurses (20%) and nurse supervisors (17%) also identified. Nurses identified predominant factors contributing to verbal abuse as high stress situations (70%) inadequate staffing (57%) administrative time and productivity pressures (52%) competence of the nurse (45). Verbal abuse was personally experienced by approximately 200 of these nurses several times a year (65%), more than monthly (20%) and once a week or more (13%). The most frequent types of verbal abuse reported include, abusive anger, judging-criticizing, accusing-blaming, blocking-diverting, abuse as jokes, discounting, trivializing, ignoring, and condescending with abusive anger, judging-criticizing, ignoring, and condescending as the most stressful to experience. Thirty five or 14% indicated they had left a nursing position because of verbal abuse from other nurses. Statements by nurses who experienced abusive situations include: &quot;Nurses that are verbally abusive, not helpful and nurturing, are poison.&quot; &quot;It is a sorry state of affairs when an employee has no recourse but to resign a position she liked.&quot; <br/>IMPLICATIONS: RESULTS: suggest that interpersonal conflict among nurses is occurring; affecting nurses and the care they provide. The literature indicates that patient safety is directly linked to staff conflicts and this unhealthy environment is likely a contributor to difficulties for health care facilities in recruiting and retaining staff nurses. Interventions such as interpersonal conflict educational programs must be designed and implemented for practicing nurses as well as developing and including this content in basic nursing education curricula. Limitations include the small sample size plus complexity and length of the VAS.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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