AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY OF NURSES' PERCEPTION OF END OF LIFE DISCUSSIONS OUTSIDE OF THE ICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157460
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY OF NURSES' PERCEPTION OF END OF LIFE DISCUSSIONS OUTSIDE OF THE ICU
Abstract:
AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY OF NURSES' PERCEPTION OF END OF LIFE DISCUSSIONS OUTSIDE OF THE ICU
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Browne, Jennifer A., MSN, RN-BC, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Northeast Baptist Hospital
Title:Doctoral Student UTHSCSA
Contact Address:8811 Village Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78218, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this exploratory pilot survey study was to explore nurses' perceptions of end-of life (EOL) conversations specific to gravely ill patients. As part of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) evaluation survey, EOL questions were included. It had been identified that the RRT system was often initiated and aggressive intervention carried out; only to have the patient's code status changed once the patient reached the ICU. We therefore became interested in asking what the non-ICU nurses comfort level was with EOL discussion and whether these nurses felt more EOL education would be beneficial.
RATIONALE: Discussions surrounding end-of-life issues can be difficult for patients, healthcare professionals and families. Even in an atmosphere of poor prognosis and patient suffering the topic is often avoided. Research has shown family members specifically identify communication failure as a primary concern in end-of-life care.
METHODS: This exploratory pilot survey was undertaken at a 300 bed acute care hospital in South Texas. The units surveyed include medical-surgical, telemetry, intensive care step-down, obstetrical, oncology, orthopedic, bariatric and geri-psych inpatient services. Seventy two nurses, representative of a 24 hour staff census were surveyed. Day and night shift were sampled equally; responses to the survey were anonymous, with demographic identifiers specific to unit, shift and license type only. End of life questions were asked using a 1-5 Likert Scale with 1 being strongly disagree to 5 being strongly agree. This project was reviewed and approved by the hospital IRB.
RESULTS: Nurses were asked to respond to EOL queries based on their last experience with the RRT team. Thinking back to their last RRT experience, there was an inverse relationship between the number of years in nursing and the perception that an EOL discussion would have been appropriate. There was also an inverse correlation between the number of years in nursing and the perceived need for EOL education. Nurses with the least experience felt they needed the most education. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between number of years in nursing and comfort in having the EOL discussions.
IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study does suggest a differing perspective of EOL discussion between nurses of varying experience levels. More research may be indicated to explore differing perceptions of EOL care and discussion in varying groups of nurses. Further research, coupled with an identified need for EOL education may support the improvement of end of life care planning whereby end of life triggers coupled with nursing education may affect an earlier discussion of the use of heroic measures.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAN EXPLORATORY SURVEY OF NURSES' PERCEPTION OF END OF LIFE DISCUSSIONS OUTSIDE OF THE ICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157460-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY OF NURSES' PERCEPTION OF END OF LIFE DISCUSSIONS OUTSIDE OF THE ICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Browne, Jennifer A., MSN, RN-BC, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northeast Baptist Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student UTHSCSA</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8811 Village Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78218, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brownej2@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this exploratory pilot survey study was to explore nurses' perceptions of end-of life (EOL) conversations specific to gravely ill patients. As part of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) evaluation survey, EOL questions were included. It had been identified that the RRT system was often initiated and aggressive intervention carried out; only to have the patient's code status changed once the patient reached the ICU. We therefore became interested in asking what the non-ICU nurses comfort level was with EOL discussion and whether these nurses felt more EOL education would be beneficial.<br/>RATIONALE: Discussions surrounding end-of-life issues can be difficult for patients, healthcare professionals and families. Even in an atmosphere of poor prognosis and patient suffering the topic is often avoided. Research has shown family members specifically identify communication failure as a primary concern in end-of-life care.<br/>METHODS: This exploratory pilot survey was undertaken at a 300 bed acute care hospital in South Texas. The units surveyed include medical-surgical, telemetry, intensive care step-down, obstetrical, oncology, orthopedic, bariatric and geri-psych inpatient services. Seventy two nurses, representative of a 24 hour staff census were surveyed. Day and night shift were sampled equally; responses to the survey were anonymous, with demographic identifiers specific to unit, shift and license type only. End of life questions were asked using a 1-5 Likert Scale with 1 being strongly disagree to 5 being strongly agree. This project was reviewed and approved by the hospital IRB. <br/>RESULTS: Nurses were asked to respond to EOL queries based on their last experience with the RRT team. Thinking back to their last RRT experience, there was an inverse relationship between the number of years in nursing and the perception that an EOL discussion would have been appropriate. There was also an inverse correlation between the number of years in nursing and the perceived need for EOL education. Nurses with the least experience felt they needed the most education. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between number of years in nursing and comfort in having the EOL discussions. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study does suggest a differing perspective of EOL discussion between nurses of varying experience levels. More research may be indicated to explore differing perceptions of EOL care and discussion in varying groups of nurses. Further research, coupled with an identified need for EOL education may support the improvement of end of life care planning whereby end of life triggers coupled with nursing education may affect an earlier discussion of the use of heroic measures. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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