APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: A HOPEFUL METHODOLOGY FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157461
Type:
Presentation
Title:
APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: A HOPEFUL METHODOLOGY FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA
Abstract:
APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: A HOPEFUL METHODOLOGY FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Buckland, Helen T., PhD, MEd, (Counseling)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Coordinator
Contact Address:155 NE 100th Street, Suite 304, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA
Co-Authors:Karen Schepp
PURPOSE/AIMS: This mixed METHODS: descriptive study had two aims: 1) to define happiness evidenced in lives of young adults (ages 18-35) with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (SCZ) through use of Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a strength-based methodology and 2) to explore use of an AI intervention to increase hope among young adults with SCZ.
BACKGROUND: Happiness, variably defined in the literature, has not been defined for young adults with schizophrenia. Unique developmental needs related to age, mental illness, and co-morbidity of substance use, make it important to define happiness from their perspective to engage them effectively in treatment planning. Additionally, increasing the experience of hope, a concept critical to recovery, is important as a motivator for engagement.
METHODS: AI was used to develop an interview schedule of three one hour long semi-structured interviews with each of twelve study participants over a six week period. Sample first interview items addressed peak experiences in their lives, characteristics valued in themselves and wishes for happiness. Collage, storytelling and goal setting were used in the second interview to describe their ideal happy life. Third interview items identified supports for their happiness goals. Reflections on happy experiences between interviews were discussed at the beginning of each session. Individual hope measures occurred at three time points: beginning of the first interview (week one), end of the second interview (week two) and end of the third interview (week six). Interpretive analysis of qualitative data was followed by content analysis. Two additional coders from other disciplines, Social Work and Psychology, determined the validity and reliability of happiness themes. Changes in levels of hope were demonstrated through use of paired t-tests. Pearson's Correlation at the .05 level of significance was used to show correlations among measures.
RESULTS: A definition of happiness emerged similar to that of peers without SCZ: a subjective feeling that increased positive affect and decreased negative affect, leading to a sense of contentment and satisfaction with life. Themes included: material happiness (owning/having access to things and experiences), relational happiness (connecting with self, others, and/or a spiritual entity), and health happiness (experiencing bodily, mental positive states). Unique challenges to happiness surfaced related to experiences of safety, medication, isolation, boredom, and normalcy. Statistical significance, demonstrating increased hope using the AI intervention, resulted for two of three hope measures. A third measure, highly correlated with the others, demonstrated a trend toward increased hope.
IMPLICATIONS: Availability of a definition of happiness for this population leads to the possibility of developing a tool to measure happiness, testing a causal model which includes happiness as instrumental in recovery, and piloting improved psychiatric nursing initiated behavioral treatments related to identification of unique challenges to happiness. As well, AI may potentially support recovery in individuals with other chronic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAPPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: A HOPEFUL METHODOLOGY FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157461-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: A HOPEFUL METHODOLOGY FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buckland, Helen T., PhD, MEd, (Counseling)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">155 NE 100th Street, Suite 304, Seattle, WA, 98125, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">trezbuck@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Schepp</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: This mixed METHODS: descriptive study had two aims: 1) to define happiness evidenced in lives of young adults (ages 18-35) with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (SCZ) through use of Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a strength-based methodology and 2) to explore use of an AI intervention to increase hope among young adults with SCZ. <br/>BACKGROUND: Happiness, variably defined in the literature, has not been defined for young adults with schizophrenia. Unique developmental needs related to age, mental illness, and co-morbidity of substance use, make it important to define happiness from their perspective to engage them effectively in treatment planning. Additionally, increasing the experience of hope, a concept critical to recovery, is important as a motivator for engagement.<br/>METHODS: AI was used to develop an interview schedule of three one hour long semi-structured interviews with each of twelve study participants over a six week period. Sample first interview items addressed peak experiences in their lives, characteristics valued in themselves and wishes for happiness. Collage, storytelling and goal setting were used in the second interview to describe their ideal happy life. Third interview items identified supports for their happiness goals. Reflections on happy experiences between interviews were discussed at the beginning of each session. Individual hope measures occurred at three time points: beginning of the first interview (week one), end of the second interview (week two) and end of the third interview (week six). Interpretive analysis of qualitative data was followed by content analysis. Two additional coders from other disciplines, Social Work and Psychology, determined the validity and reliability of happiness themes. Changes in levels of hope were demonstrated through use of paired t-tests. Pearson's Correlation at the .05 level of significance was used to show correlations among measures. <br/>RESULTS: A definition of happiness emerged similar to that of peers without SCZ: a subjective feeling that increased positive affect and decreased negative affect, leading to a sense of contentment and satisfaction with life. Themes included: material happiness (owning/having access to things and experiences), relational happiness (connecting with self, others, and/or a spiritual entity), and health happiness (experiencing bodily, mental positive states). Unique challenges to happiness surfaced related to experiences of safety, medication, isolation, boredom, and normalcy. Statistical significance, demonstrating increased hope using the AI intervention, resulted for two of three hope measures. A third measure, highly correlated with the others, demonstrated a trend toward increased hope. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Availability of a definition of happiness for this population leads to the possibility of developing a tool to measure happiness, testing a causal model which includes happiness as instrumental in recovery, and piloting improved psychiatric nursing initiated behavioral treatments related to identification of unique challenges to happiness. As well, AI may potentially support recovery in individuals with other chronic conditions.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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