2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157462
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ENVIRONMENTAL RISK REDUCTION THROUGH NURSING INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
Abstract:
ENVIRONMENTAL RISK REDUCTION THROUGH NURSING INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Butterfield, Patricia G., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University College of Nursing
Title:Dean & Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
Co-Authors:Tamara Odom-Maryon; Julie Postma
PURPOSES/AIMS: A RCT was conducted to test the impact of a public health nurse intervention on child, family, and household measures of environmental risk reduction (ERR). The findings from this study are presented.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Providing environmental health information to rural low income families during a series of home visits is a common-sense way of integrating risk reduction activities into existing public health services. Following the precaution adoption process model (PAPM), increasing parents' stage of action (SOA) towards ERR and ERR self-efficacy may yield required health behavioral changes for ERR within the home. METHODS: Baseline demographics (age, education, marital status, and socioeconomic factors) were comparable between groups. At three months, the intervention 1) increased the odds of having progression in SOA from baseline for all environmental risks (OR (95% CI) WW:1.8 (1.1,2.9); lead:3.0 (1.8,5.1); radon:2.4 (1.1,5.2); moisture:2.5 (1.5,4.2); 2HS: non-significant; CO: 2.1(1.4, 4.2); and 2) increased reported SE for all ERs (Beta (95% CI) WW:7.6 (3.8,11.5); lead:12.0 (7.6,16.4); radon:16.7 (6.7,26.7); moisture:8.3 (4.4,12.1); 2HS:4.4 (1.8, 7.2); CO:8.5 (4.6, 12.4). Within the intervention group, no significant changes in 7 month progression in SOA from baseline compared to 3 month progression in SOA from baseline were found. Similarly, no significant changes in self efficacy from 3 months to 7 months (adjusting for baseline) were found.
RESULTS: Baseline demographics (age, education, marital status, and socioeconomic factors) were comparable between groups. At three months, the intervention 1) increased the odds of having progression in SOA from baseline for all environmental risks (OR (95% CI) WW:1.8 (1.1,2.9); lead:3.0 (1.8,5.1); radon:2.4 (1.1,5.2); moisture:2.5 (1.5,4.2); 2HS: non-significant; CO: 2.1(1.4, 4.2); and 2) increased reported SE for all ERs (? (95% CI) WW:7.6 (3.8,11.5); lead:12.0 (7.6,16.4); radon:16.7 (6.7,26.7); moisture:8.3 (4.4,12.1); 2HS:4.4 (1.8, 7.2); CO:8.5 (4.6, 12.4). Within the intervention group, no significant changes in 7 month progression in SOA from baseline compared to 3 month progression in SOA from baseline were found. Similarly, no significant changes in self efficacy from 3 months to 7 months (adjusting for baseline) were found.
IMPLICATIONS: Modifying health behavior is a key component to reducing ER in the home. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention and education on increasing parentsÆ intention and action towards reducing ER as well as their confidence in their ability to do so.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleENVIRONMENTAL RISK REDUCTION THROUGH NURSING INTERVENTION AND EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157462-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ENVIRONMENTAL RISK REDUCTION THROUGH NURSING INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butterfield, Patricia G., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean &amp; Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbutter@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tamara Odom-Maryon; Julie Postma</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: A RCT was conducted to test the impact of a public health nurse intervention on child, family, and household measures of environmental risk reduction (ERR). The findings from this study are presented. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Providing environmental health information to rural low income families during a series of home visits is a common-sense way of integrating risk reduction activities into existing public health services. Following the precaution adoption process model (PAPM), increasing parents' stage of action (SOA) towards ERR and ERR self-efficacy may yield required health behavioral changes for ERR within the home. METHODS: Baseline demographics (age, education, marital status, and socioeconomic factors) were comparable between groups. At three months, the intervention 1) increased the odds of having progression in SOA from baseline for all environmental risks (OR (95% CI) WW:1.8 (1.1,2.9); lead:3.0 (1.8,5.1); radon:2.4 (1.1,5.2); moisture:2.5 (1.5,4.2); 2HS: non-significant; CO: 2.1(1.4, 4.2); and 2) increased reported SE for all ERs (Beta (95% CI) WW:7.6 (3.8,11.5); lead:12.0 (7.6,16.4); radon:16.7 (6.7,26.7); moisture:8.3 (4.4,12.1); 2HS:4.4 (1.8, 7.2); CO:8.5 (4.6, 12.4). Within the intervention group, no significant changes in 7 month progression in SOA from baseline compared to 3 month progression in SOA from baseline were found. Similarly, no significant changes in self efficacy from 3 months to 7 months (adjusting for baseline) were found.<br/>RESULTS: Baseline demographics (age, education, marital status, and socioeconomic factors) were comparable between groups. At three months, the intervention 1) increased the odds of having progression in SOA from baseline for all environmental risks (OR (95% CI) WW:1.8 (1.1,2.9); lead:3.0 (1.8,5.1); radon:2.4 (1.1,5.2); moisture:2.5 (1.5,4.2); 2HS: non-significant; CO: 2.1(1.4, 4.2); and 2) increased reported SE for all ERs (? (95% CI) WW:7.6 (3.8,11.5); lead:12.0 (7.6,16.4); radon:16.7 (6.7,26.7); moisture:8.3 (4.4,12.1); 2HS:4.4 (1.8, 7.2); CO:8.5 (4.6, 12.4). Within the intervention group, no significant changes in 7 month progression in SOA from baseline compared to 3 month progression in SOA from baseline were found. Similarly, no significant changes in self efficacy from 3 months to 7 months (adjusting for baseline) were found.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Modifying health behavior is a key component to reducing ER in the home. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention and education on increasing parents&AElig; intention and action towards reducing ER as well as their confidence in their ability to do so.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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