2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND HELP SEEKING BEHAVIORS IN IMMIGRANT HISPANIC WOMEN
Abstract:
POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND HELP SEEKING BEHAVIORS IN IMMIGRANT HISPANIC WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Renea Beckstrand; Emily Litt; Cheryl Corbett; Glauco Souza
PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the experience of having symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and identify help seeking behaviors in immigrant Hispanic women.
BACKGROUND: Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing minority group living in the United States. Between 2000 and 2006, Hispanics accounted for 50% of the nation's growth. Hispanic women have the highest fertility rate of all ethnic/racial groups, comprising 23% of the births in the United States (US Census Bureau, 2007). PPD is pervasive across culturally diverse women, and while it is prevalent among disadvantaged Hispanic women, it is not readily detected by women or their clinicians. A recent study documented the incidence of symptoms of PPD in Hispanic women in a community health center in a western state. The incidence of PPD was over 50% using the Beck PPD Screening Scale-Spanish version (PDSS). This scale has an alpha reliability in Mexican women of .94, and the majority of women seen in the clinic are of Mexican descent. Many of the women declined to make appointments for mental health services, and shared with the researchers the multiple stressors they were experiencing in their lives. Based on this study, the need was identified to gain and understanding of the experience of having symptoms of PPD in immigrant Hispanic women, and to assess why these women often decline to seek mental health services.
METHOD: Twenty women were recruited from a sample of 100 immigrant Hispanic women receiving services at a community health center in a western state. Inclusion criteria included having a cutoff score above 60 on the PPDSS-Spanish Version. The purposive sample included women of varying ages and educational levels, some of which were first-time mothers and others who had more than one child. Following informed consent, the women participated either in a focus group or individual audio-taped interviews with Spanish speaking members of the research team. Data were transcribed and translated, then analyzed individually and collectively by members of the research team.
INITIAL RESULTS: Women sought help from their families rather than healthcare providers, but many were isolated and lacked social support and continue to experience symptoms of PPD. They stated it was not culturally common to seek mental health services in their countries of origin. Barriers identified confirmed findings in the literature, including lack of time, stigma related to mental illness and seeking care for mental illness, immigration status, linguistic and cultural barriers, and childcare issues.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Limited social networks and barriers to health care, including mental health services, should be addressed in order to foster positive outcomes in these vulnerable women. Focusing on the protective strength factors in these women, such as resiliency and life satisfaction in designing interventions is essential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePOSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND HELP SEEKING BEHAVIORS IN IMMIGRANT HISPANIC WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION AND HELP SEEKING BEHAVIORS IN IMMIGRANT HISPANIC WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Renea Beckstrand; Emily Litt; Cheryl Corbett; Glauco Souza</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the experience of having symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and identify help seeking behaviors in immigrant Hispanic women. <br/>BACKGROUND: Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing minority group living in the United States. Between 2000 and 2006, Hispanics accounted for 50% of the nation's growth. Hispanic women have the highest fertility rate of all ethnic/racial groups, comprising 23% of the births in the United States (US Census Bureau, 2007). PPD is pervasive across culturally diverse women, and while it is prevalent among disadvantaged Hispanic women, it is not readily detected by women or their clinicians. A recent study documented the incidence of symptoms of PPD in Hispanic women in a community health center in a western state. The incidence of PPD was over 50% using the Beck PPD Screening Scale-Spanish version (PDSS). This scale has an alpha reliability in Mexican women of .94, and the majority of women seen in the clinic are of Mexican descent. Many of the women declined to make appointments for mental health services, and shared with the researchers the multiple stressors they were experiencing in their lives. Based on this study, the need was identified to gain and understanding of the experience of having symptoms of PPD in immigrant Hispanic women, and to assess why these women often decline to seek mental health services. <br/>METHOD: Twenty women were recruited from a sample of 100 immigrant Hispanic women receiving services at a community health center in a western state. Inclusion criteria included having a cutoff score above 60 on the PPDSS-Spanish Version. The purposive sample included women of varying ages and educational levels, some of which were first-time mothers and others who had more than one child. Following informed consent, the women participated either in a focus group or individual audio-taped interviews with Spanish speaking members of the research team. Data were transcribed and translated, then analyzed individually and collectively by members of the research team. <br/>INITIAL RESULTS: Women sought help from their families rather than healthcare providers, but many were isolated and lacked social support and continue to experience symptoms of PPD. They stated it was not culturally common to seek mental health services in their countries of origin. Barriers identified confirmed findings in the literature, including lack of time, stigma related to mental illness and seeking care for mental illness, immigration status, linguistic and cultural barriers, and childcare issues. <br/>IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Limited social networks and barriers to health care, including mental health services, should be addressed in order to foster positive outcomes in these vulnerable women. Focusing on the protective strength factors in these women, such as resiliency and life satisfaction in designing interventions is essential.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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