2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157465
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PEER, PARENTAL, AND MEDIA INFLUENCE ON ADOLESCENT BODY IMAGE
Abstract:
PEER, PARENTAL, AND MEDIA INFLUENCE ON ADOLESCENT BODY IMAGE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Chan, Shu-Min, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:ASU Collage of nursing and health innovation
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:200 E FILLMORE Street Apt#252, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Angela Chia-Chen Chen; Pay-Fan Lin
PURPOSES/AIMS: This study aimed at examining peer, parental, and media influence on body image among Taiwanese adolescents with different Body Mass Index (BMI) values.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Constructing and developing body image is a critical task for adolescents. Positive body image can improve adolescentsÆ self-concept and peer-relationship, while negative body image is found to be associated with eating disorders, malnutrition or depression. It is critical to understand factors that influence adolescentsÆ body image with different BMI values, so prevention interventions can be developed and tailored to meet their unique needs.
METHODS: This cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 403 adolescents (aged 18-21) from four colleges/universities in Taipei, Taiwan. Body image was measured using two subscales of the Chinese version "Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire," including appearance evaluation and body areas satisfaction. Other measures included Exercise Behavior Questionnaire, Media Influence Scale, Parent Influence Scale, and Peer Influence Scale. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to analyze data.
RESULTS: Although a higher proportion of adolescent males were obese/overweight (10.16 %) than females (2.73%), males reported a higher score in appearance evaluation and body areas satisfaction than females. The regression analysis revealed that male or underweight/normal adolescents reported higher appearance evaluation. Adolescents also reported lower appearance evaluation if they were less likely to discuss weight-related topics with peers, perceived peer support for losing weight and perceived negative peer attitudes towards their appearance or weight. Furthermore, adolescents who had parents encouraging a healthy diet and exercise for weight control showed higher appearance evaluation. Similar to appearance evaluation, adolescents reported better body areas satisfaction if they were boys, were underweight/normal, were more likely to discuss weight-related issues with peers, and perceived less negative attitudes towards their appearance/weight from peers. Regarding media influence, adolescents were less likely to be satisfied with their own bodies if they wish to have a body like models or movie stars.
IMPLICATIONS: The findings suggested strong peer influence on adolescents' evaluation of their appearance and satisfaction of their bodies. Parents had significant influence on adolescent appearance evaluation, while media shaped adolescentsÆ perception of their own bodies. Compared to adolescent males, females were less likely to have positive evaluation of their appearance or satisfied with their bodies, and consequently maybe at higher-risk of developing unhealthy dieting behaviors. Peer, parental, and media influence and gender differences should be taken into account when designing prevention interventions to promote adolescent health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePEER, PARENTAL, AND MEDIA INFLUENCE ON ADOLESCENT BODY IMAGEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157465-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PEER, PARENTAL, AND MEDIA INFLUENCE ON ADOLESCENT BODY IMAGE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chan, Shu-Min, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">ASU Collage of nursing and health innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">200 E FILLMORE Street Apt#252, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pamiechan2002@yahoo.com.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Angela Chia-Chen Chen; Pay-Fan Lin</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: This study aimed at examining peer, parental, and media influence on body image among Taiwanese adolescents with different Body Mass Index (BMI) values.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Constructing and developing body image is a critical task for adolescents. Positive body image can improve adolescents&AElig; self-concept and peer-relationship, while negative body image is found to be associated with eating disorders, malnutrition or depression. It is critical to understand factors that influence adolescents&AElig; body image with different BMI values, so prevention interventions can be developed and tailored to meet their unique needs. <br/>METHODS: This cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 403 adolescents (aged 18-21) from four colleges/universities in Taipei, Taiwan. Body image was measured using two subscales of the Chinese version &quot;Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire,&quot; including appearance evaluation and body areas satisfaction. Other measures included Exercise Behavior Questionnaire, Media Influence Scale, Parent Influence Scale, and Peer Influence Scale. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to analyze data.<br/>RESULTS: Although a higher proportion of adolescent males were obese/overweight (10.16 %) than females (2.73%), males reported a higher score in appearance evaluation and body areas satisfaction than females. The regression analysis revealed that male or underweight/normal adolescents reported higher appearance evaluation. Adolescents also reported lower appearance evaluation if they were less likely to discuss weight-related topics with peers, perceived peer support for losing weight and perceived negative peer attitudes towards their appearance or weight. Furthermore, adolescents who had parents encouraging a healthy diet and exercise for weight control showed higher appearance evaluation. Similar to appearance evaluation, adolescents reported better body areas satisfaction if they were boys, were underweight/normal, were more likely to discuss weight-related issues with peers, and perceived less negative attitudes towards their appearance/weight from peers. Regarding media influence, adolescents were less likely to be satisfied with their own bodies if they wish to have a body like models or movie stars. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The findings suggested strong peer influence on adolescents' evaluation of their appearance and satisfaction of their bodies. Parents had significant influence on adolescent appearance evaluation, while media shaped adolescents&AElig; perception of their own bodies. Compared to adolescent males, females were less likely to have positive evaluation of their appearance or satisfied with their bodies, and consequently maybe at higher-risk of developing unhealthy dieting behaviors. Peer, parental, and media influence and gender differences should be taken into account when designing prevention interventions to promote adolescent health. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:53:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:53:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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