2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157468
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AMONG CALIFORNIA ASIAN ADULTS
Abstract:
RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AMONG CALIFORNIA ASIAN ADULTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Choi, Sarah E., PhD, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Irvine
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:214 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697-3959, USA
AIMS: We examined the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in five Asian subgroups in California (Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipinos, and Vietnamese), and whether lifestyle and risk factors explain differences in DM prevalence between Asian subgroups and Caucasians.
BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing DM prevalence and rates of population growth of Asian Americans, little is known about DM risks of this group; it is unclear whether risk factors identified among Caucasians are equally applicable to Asian Americans. Furthermore, Asian Americans are a heterogeneous group with diverse culture, health practices, and lifestyles, yet there is inadequate information regarding DM risk factors within each Asian subgroup.
METHODS: 3,191 Asian subgroup adults (greater than or equal to 18 years) and 30,554 Caucasian adults from the California Health Interview Survey 2005 were examined for the prevalence of DM and various risk factors. Multiple logistic regression models examined DM likelihood among Asian subgroups relative to Caucasians in consideration of lifestyle and risk factors.RESULTS: The prevalence of DM among Koreans was 7.4%, lower than Japanese (10.2%) and Filipinos (8.6%), but higher than Caucasians (6%). However, after adjusting for risk factors, Koreans had the highest likelihood of DM (OR=2.71, CI= [1.82-4.03], p<0.01), followed by Filipinos (2.20, [1.38-3.52], p<0.01) and Japanese (2.04, [1.23-3.39], p<0.01), relative to Caucasians.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that even after accounting for lifestyle and other risk factor differences between Caucasians and key Asian subgroups in California, Koreans, Filipinos, and Japanese have a two to three-fold greater likelihood of DM compared to Caucasians.

IMPLICATIONS: Prevalence rates may not necessarily reflect risk factor-adjusted likelihood of DM. Our findings suggest California Asian adultsÆ risk factors associated with DM vary and highlight the need to study Asian subgroups individually, not as an aggregate, and to consider socio-economic, cultural, environmental factors as well as genetics and other novel risk factors when assessing DM risk and prevalence among Asian subgroups. In addition, increased attention for preventive measures is needed for Koreans to reduce the further rise of DM in this group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AMONG CALIFORNIA ASIAN ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157468-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AMONG CALIFORNIA ASIAN ADULTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Sarah E., PhD, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Irvine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">214 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697-3959, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sechoi@uci.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">AIMS: We examined the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in five Asian subgroups in California (Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipinos, and Vietnamese), and whether lifestyle and risk factors explain differences in DM prevalence between Asian subgroups and Caucasians. <br/>BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing DM prevalence and rates of population growth of Asian Americans, little is known about DM risks of this group; it is unclear whether risk factors identified among Caucasians are equally applicable to Asian Americans. Furthermore, Asian Americans are a heterogeneous group with diverse culture, health practices, and lifestyles, yet there is inadequate information regarding DM risk factors within each Asian subgroup.<br/>METHODS: 3,191 Asian subgroup adults (greater than or equal to 18 years) and 30,554 Caucasian adults from the California Health Interview Survey 2005 were examined for the prevalence of DM and various risk factors. Multiple logistic regression models examined DM likelihood among Asian subgroups relative to Caucasians in consideration of lifestyle and risk factors.RESULTS: The prevalence of DM among Koreans was 7.4%, lower than Japanese (10.2%) and Filipinos (8.6%), but higher than Caucasians (6%). However, after adjusting for risk factors, Koreans had the highest likelihood of DM (OR=2.71, CI= [1.82-4.03], p&lt;0.01), followed by Filipinos (2.20, [1.38-3.52], p&lt;0.01) and Japanese (2.04, [1.23-3.39], p&lt;0.01), relative to Caucasians.<br/><br/>CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that even after accounting for lifestyle and other risk factor differences between Caucasians and key Asian subgroups in California, Koreans, Filipinos, and Japanese have a two to three-fold greater likelihood of DM compared to Caucasians. <br/><br/>IMPLICATIONS: Prevalence rates may not necessarily reflect risk factor-adjusted likelihood of DM. Our findings suggest California Asian adults&AElig; risk factors associated with DM vary and highlight the need to study Asian subgroups individually, not as an aggregate, and to consider socio-economic, cultural, environmental factors as well as genetics and other novel risk factors when assessing DM risk and prevalence among Asian subgroups. In addition, increased attention for preventive measures is needed for Koreans to reduce the further rise of DM in this group.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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