2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREDICTORS OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ADOLESCENT CHILDHOOD OBESITY
Abstract:
PREDICTORS OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ADOLESCENT CHILDHOOD OBESITY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Choi, Myunghan, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Research Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Co-Authors:Bonnie Gance-Cleveland; Fermin Renteria; Wendy Wardbegnoche
BACKGROUND: Obesity in children and adolescents has become a national epidemic and the medical cost related to their comorbities is dramatically increasing. Understanding the factors that impact children's risk factors for unhealthy life styles is critical in order to address the current obesity epidemic.
OBJECTIVE: To predict factors for nutritional intention, nutritional knowledge, physical activity and social support among middle school adolescents by controlling Body Mass Index (BMI) and Self Report Weight (SRW).
METHODS: Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analysis was used to predict factors of dependent variables by 3 measurements (pre, post, and follow up) controlling for BMI and SRW. A total of 511 convenient sample (N = 231 for pre test, N = 222 for post test, and N = 58 for follow up) was selected for the study. Covariance parameters based on repeated effect of 3 time measurements were calculated for each dependent variable. All data analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 17).
RESULTS: Gender (F = 20.6, p <.01), race (F = 3.5, p < .051 and comorbidity (F = 4.1, p <.01) were significant predictors for nutritional intention. Gender (F = 10.6, p < .01), race (F = 7.4, p < .01), and age (F = 5.0, p < .01) were significant predictors for nutritional knowledge. Age ( F = 4.5, p < .01) was the only predictor for physical activity with family and friends. However, gender (F = 30.3, p < .01), race (F = 3.1, p < .01), and comorbidity (F = 4.2, p < .01) were significant predictors for physical activity in past 7 days. Regarding social support, race (F = 3.0, p < .05) was the only predictor for family participation. Race (F = 2.5, p < .05) and age (F = 2.7, p < .05) were significant predictors for friend reward and punishment in social support.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate female, Caucasian and older children had higher nutritional knowledge and more involved in physical activity as well as received social support than African American children over the course of intervention.
IMPLICATIONS: Gender specific and culturally specific interventions are needed to address the current childhood obesity epidemic.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREDICTORS OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ADOLESCENT CHILDHOOD OBESITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREDICTORS OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ADOLESCENT CHILDHOOD OBESITY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Myunghan, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Research Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mchoi7@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Gance-Cleveland; Fermin Renteria; Wendy Wardbegnoche</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Obesity in children and adolescents has become a national epidemic and the medical cost related to their comorbities is dramatically increasing. Understanding the factors that impact children's risk factors for unhealthy life styles is critical in order to address the current obesity epidemic. <br/>OBJECTIVE: To predict factors for nutritional intention, nutritional knowledge, physical activity and social support among middle school adolescents by controlling Body Mass Index (BMI) and Self Report Weight (SRW). <br/>METHODS: Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analysis was used to predict factors of dependent variables by 3 measurements (pre, post, and follow up) controlling for BMI and SRW. A total of 511 convenient sample (N = 231 for pre test, N = 222 for post test, and N = 58 for follow up) was selected for the study. Covariance parameters based on repeated effect of 3 time measurements were calculated for each dependent variable. All data analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 17). <br/>RESULTS: Gender (F = 20.6, p &lt;.01), race (F = 3.5, p &lt; .051 and comorbidity (F = 4.1, p &lt;.01) were significant predictors for nutritional intention. Gender (F = 10.6, p &lt; .01), race (F = 7.4, p &lt; .01), and age (F = 5.0, p &lt; .01) were significant predictors for nutritional knowledge. Age ( F = 4.5, p &lt; .01) was the only predictor for physical activity with family and friends. However, gender (F = 30.3, p &lt; .01), race (F = 3.1, p &lt; .01), and comorbidity (F = 4.2, p &lt; .01) were significant predictors for physical activity in past 7 days. Regarding social support, race (F = 3.0, p &lt; .05) was the only predictor for family participation. Race (F = 2.5, p &lt; .05) and age (F = 2.7, p &lt; .05) were significant predictors for friend reward and punishment in social support. <br/>CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate female, Caucasian and older children had higher nutritional knowledge and more involved in physical activity as well as received social support than African American children over the course of intervention. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Gender specific and culturally specific interventions are needed to address the current childhood obesity epidemic.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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