2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157470
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE PROCESS OF CBPR WITH YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES
Abstract:
THE PROCESS OF CBPR WITH YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Clark, Lauren, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Professor
Contact Address:10 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Co-Authors:Alison Eldredge; Susan Johnson; Jeff Burley; Marge Pett; Cathy Chambless; Erin Rothwell; Beth Cardell
PURPOSES/AIMS:
In a progressive sequence, qualitative and quantitative community-based participatory research (CBPR) assessed the healthy lifestyle concerns of young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), their parents, and professionals to collaboratively determine a future research agenda and structure community partnerships to sustain interventions.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Prevalence of overweight among young adults with ID is nearly double that of non-disabled peers. The transition to adulthood coincides with a propensity for weight gain and an opportunity to incorporate health lifestyle behaviors. Self-determination of young adults at this key developmental time fits with the tenets of CBPR.
METHODS:
The process of CBPR began with a survey of parents, followed by focus groups and individual interviews with young adults, parents, and professionals to elaborate on their desires for healthy lifestyle interventions and barriers to change. Second, critical review and selection of an intervention curriculum to fit researcher and population needs was completed. Third, securing seed grant funding for feasibility testing of the intervention and proposed study measures was successfully completed with partnership development.
RESULTS:
Survey responses (n=56) indicate obesity is viewed as a widespread problem (58%) for young adults with ID, and a willingness to address healthy lifestyles in families (96%). Qualitative data generated by 30 participants in interviews and focus groups yielded the following themes: healthy lifestyle threats and solutions embedded in daily life; the value of socially-oriented interventions; acceptance of measures to document progressive improvement; and under-recognized concerns of young adults in program planning. These RESULTS: informed curriculum modification and collaboration with community partners to assure intervention integrity and sustainability.
IMPLICATIONS:
For healthy lifestyle interventions for young adults with ID, the CBPR process can build political will among study partners and contribute to research goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE PROCESS OF CBPR WITH YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157470-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE PROCESS OF CBPR WITH YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Lauren, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lauren.clark@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alison Eldredge; Susan Johnson; Jeff Burley; Marge Pett; Cathy Chambless; Erin Rothwell; Beth Cardell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>In a progressive sequence, qualitative and quantitative community-based participatory research (CBPR) assessed the healthy lifestyle concerns of young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), their parents, and professionals to collaboratively determine a future research agenda and structure community partnerships to sustain interventions. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Prevalence of overweight among young adults with ID is nearly double that of non-disabled peers. The transition to adulthood coincides with a propensity for weight gain and an opportunity to incorporate health lifestyle behaviors. Self-determination of young adults at this key developmental time fits with the tenets of CBPR. <br/>METHODS: <br/>The process of CBPR began with a survey of parents, followed by focus groups and individual interviews with young adults, parents, and professionals to elaborate on their desires for healthy lifestyle interventions and barriers to change. Second, critical review and selection of an intervention curriculum to fit researcher and population needs was completed. Third, securing seed grant funding for feasibility testing of the intervention and proposed study measures was successfully completed with partnership development. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Survey responses (n=56) indicate obesity is viewed as a widespread problem (58%) for young adults with ID, and a willingness to address healthy lifestyles in families (96%). Qualitative data generated by 30 participants in interviews and focus groups yielded the following themes: healthy lifestyle threats and solutions embedded in daily life; the value of socially-oriented interventions; acceptance of measures to document progressive improvement; and under-recognized concerns of young adults in program planning. These RESULTS: informed curriculum modification and collaboration with community partners to assure intervention integrity and sustainability.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>For healthy lifestyle interventions for young adults with ID, the CBPR process can build political will among study partners and contribute to research goals.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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