2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157471
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NURSE RESIDENTS' FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS ON TRANSITION TO PRACTICE
Abstract:
NURSE RESIDENTS' FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS ON TRANSITION TO PRACTICE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Clark, Cynthia M., PhD, RN, ANEF
P.I. Institution Name:Boise State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: First year turn-over rates for new nurses in clinical practice are alarming. Studies reveal turn-over rates ranging from 35-61%. New nurses experience stress related to the high levels of patient acuity and the increasing complexity of the health care environment. These factors have a direct influence on clinical competence and patient safety. Other studies found that new nurses who were assigned clinical preceptors demonstrated higher levels of clinical competency, experienced lower levels of stress, made fewer practice errors, and were less likely to leave their nursing position. The purpose of this study was to elicit Nurse Residents' perceptions of their "lived experience" in the first year of their residency in a Magnet hospital in the northwest. The study also assessed Residents' level of satisfaction with their nursing practice.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND/CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Graduates from nursing programs present myriad challenges to their hiring institutions. Many new nurses do not meet basic clinical competencies, lack critical judgment skills, and many are ill-prepared to meet the emotional demands of their first year in nursing practice. Starting a new job, working long hours and multiple shifts, as well as caring for severely ill patients can result in high levels of emotional stress, physiological distress, and high turn-over rates. Nurse Residency Programs may significantly ease the transition of new graduates into the practice setting. This study utilizes Benner's conceptual framework as the new graduate nurse enters the Residency Program as an advance beginner and perceives clinical situations differently than nurses in more advanced roles. METHODS: After receiving Human Subjects approval, and obtaining verbal consent, 37 of 83 (44.6%) Nurse Residents participated in nine separate focus groups and responded to 10 open-ended questions using Krueger's Systematic Process. The Residents' verbal comments were transcribed verbatim into spreadsheets. The researcher read and re-read the transcripts to be fully immersed in the data. Significant statements were formulated into themes until saturation of the data was reached. The themes were further reduced and organized into a final summary statement. Eighteen of 37 (48.6%) Residents reviewed the final summary to provide trustworthiness and confirmability of the findings through "member checking".
RESULTS: Overall, Residents were satisfied with their employment and all would recommend this institution to other nurses. The Residents reported being stressed by a number of factors including missing something important that could result in patient harm or death, feeling that their nursing education did not adequately prepared them for practice, and being paired with inadequate preceptors. Residents also identified a lack of communication, inadequate staffing patterns, redundant paperwork, and organizational issues as areas for improvement. Residents identified belonging to a friendly and helpful team, making a positive difference in patients' lives, and gaining confidence and experience in their new role as enjoyable aspects of their employment.
IMPLICATIONS: Understanding the "lived experience" of Nurse Residents in their transition from education to practice using Benner's framework is useful in developing and implementing orientation and transition programs for new graduates. Doing so will improve patient outcomes and positively impact nurse recruitment and retention efforts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNURSE RESIDENTS' FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS ON TRANSITION TO PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157471-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NURSE RESIDENTS' FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS ON TRANSITION TO PRACTICE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Cynthia M., PhD, RN, ANEF</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boise State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cclark@boisestate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: First year turn-over rates for new nurses in clinical practice are alarming. Studies reveal turn-over rates ranging from 35-61%. New nurses experience stress related to the high levels of patient acuity and the increasing complexity of the health care environment. These factors have a direct influence on clinical competence and patient safety. Other studies found that new nurses who were assigned clinical preceptors demonstrated higher levels of clinical competency, experienced lower levels of stress, made fewer practice errors, and were less likely to leave their nursing position. The purpose of this study was to elicit Nurse Residents' perceptions of their &quot;lived experience&quot; in the first year of their residency in a Magnet hospital in the northwest. The study also assessed Residents' level of satisfaction with their nursing practice. <br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND/CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Graduates from nursing programs present myriad challenges to their hiring institutions. Many new nurses do not meet basic clinical competencies, lack critical judgment skills, and many are ill-prepared to meet the emotional demands of their first year in nursing practice. Starting a new job, working long hours and multiple shifts, as well as caring for severely ill patients can result in high levels of emotional stress, physiological distress, and high turn-over rates. Nurse Residency Programs may significantly ease the transition of new graduates into the practice setting. This study utilizes Benner's conceptual framework as the new graduate nurse enters the Residency Program as an advance beginner and perceives clinical situations differently than nurses in more advanced roles. METHODS: After receiving Human Subjects approval, and obtaining verbal consent, 37 of 83 (44.6%) Nurse Residents participated in nine separate focus groups and responded to 10 open-ended questions using Krueger's Systematic Process. The Residents' verbal comments were transcribed verbatim into spreadsheets. The researcher read and re-read the transcripts to be fully immersed in the data. Significant statements were formulated into themes until saturation of the data was reached. The themes were further reduced and organized into a final summary statement. Eighteen of 37 (48.6%) Residents reviewed the final summary to provide trustworthiness and confirmability of the findings through &quot;member checking&quot;. <br/>RESULTS: Overall, Residents were satisfied with their employment and all would recommend this institution to other nurses. The Residents reported being stressed by a number of factors including missing something important that could result in patient harm or death, feeling that their nursing education did not adequately prepared them for practice, and being paired with inadequate preceptors. Residents also identified a lack of communication, inadequate staffing patterns, redundant paperwork, and organizational issues as areas for improvement. Residents identified belonging to a friendly and helpful team, making a positive difference in patients' lives, and gaining confidence and experience in their new role as enjoyable aspects of their employment. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Understanding the &quot;lived experience&quot; of Nurse Residents in their transition from education to practice using Benner's framework is useful in developing and implementing orientation and transition programs for new graduates. Doing so will improve patient outcomes and positively impact nurse recruitment and retention efforts.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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