2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157472
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE 'DANCE' OF CIVILITY IN NURSING EDUCATION: TESTING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL
Abstract:
THE 'DANCE' OF CIVILITY IN NURSING EDUCATION: TESTING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Clark, Cynthia M., PhD, RN, ANEF
P.I. Institution Name:Boise State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
Incivility in American society is on the rise and rude and disruptive behavior is increasing in institutions of higher learning. In nursing and other health-related disciplines, the risk assumed by not addressing uncivil behavior reaches well beyond the college campus and can negatively impact patient safety. Because nursing programs are places where students provide direct care to patients through clinical experiences, uncivil and disruptive acts must be addressed so that such behaviors do not spiral into aggression and jeopardize patient safety. The purpose of the study was to empirically test a conceptual model designed to foster civility in nursing education.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND/CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Several empirical studies reveal that stress plays an integral role in the display of uncivil and disruptive behaviors. A conceptual model developed by Clark (2008) illustrates the relationship between stress and uncivil behavior in nursing education. When heightened stress levels co-occur with negative attitudes of faculty superiority and student entitlement, encounters between faculty and students can be more intense and may lead to aggressive and threatening situations. The model suggests that reducing stress and seizing opportunities for effective engagement help foster civility. Further, when faculty and students work together to resolve conflict, the potential for the 'dance of civility' is enhanced and a safer, more civil learning environment is created.
METHODS: One hundred and thirty (130) academic nurse leaders responded to several questions designed to test the conceptual model for fostering civility in nursing education. The numerical survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis and the narrative comments were transcribed verbatim into spreadsheets and significant statements were formulated and reduced into themes.
IMPLICATIONS: Virtually all (94%) respondents perceived a relationship between stress and incivility. Respondents rated student stress as moderate (49.2%) to high (50%). Faculty stress was rated as moderate (60%) to high (33%). Forty six percent (46%) rated the level of student entitlement as high in their institution and 11% rated faculty superiority as high. Ninety four percent (94%) indicated communication is highly important in preventing incivility.
RESULTS: provide preliminary support regarding the accuracy of the conceptual model supporting the relationship between stress and academic incivility. Findings from this study suggest that reducing stress and improving communication may decrease incivility. Further empirical testing is needed to strengthen the conceptual model in order to develop 'best practices' to foster civility in nursing education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE 'DANCE' OF CIVILITY IN NURSING EDUCATION: TESTING A CONCEPTUAL MODELen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157472-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE 'DANCE' OF CIVILITY IN NURSING EDUCATION: TESTING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Cynthia M., PhD, RN, ANEF</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boise State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cclark@boisestate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>Incivility in American society is on the rise and rude and disruptive behavior is increasing in institutions of higher learning. In nursing and other health-related disciplines, the risk assumed by not addressing uncivil behavior reaches well beyond the college campus and can negatively impact patient safety. Because nursing programs are places where students provide direct care to patients through clinical experiences, uncivil and disruptive acts must be addressed so that such behaviors do not spiral into aggression and jeopardize patient safety. The purpose of the study was to empirically test a conceptual model designed to foster civility in nursing education.<br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND/CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Several empirical studies reveal that stress plays an integral role in the display of uncivil and disruptive behaviors. A conceptual model developed by Clark (2008) illustrates the relationship between stress and uncivil behavior in nursing education. When heightened stress levels co-occur with negative attitudes of faculty superiority and student entitlement, encounters between faculty and students can be more intense and may lead to aggressive and threatening situations. The model suggests that reducing stress and seizing opportunities for effective engagement help foster civility. Further, when faculty and students work together to resolve conflict, the potential for the 'dance of civility' is enhanced and a safer, more civil learning environment is created. <br/>METHODS: One hundred and thirty (130) academic nurse leaders responded to several questions designed to test the conceptual model for fostering civility in nursing education. The numerical survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis and the narrative comments were transcribed verbatim into spreadsheets and significant statements were formulated and reduced into themes. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Virtually all (94%) respondents perceived a relationship between stress and incivility. Respondents rated student stress as moderate (49.2%) to high (50%). Faculty stress was rated as moderate (60%) to high (33%). Forty six percent (46%) rated the level of student entitlement as high in their institution and 11% rated faculty superiority as high. Ninety four percent (94%) indicated communication is highly important in preventing incivility. <br/>RESULTS: provide preliminary support regarding the accuracy of the conceptual model supporting the relationship between stress and academic incivility. Findings from this study suggest that reducing stress and improving communication may decrease incivility. Further empirical testing is needed to strengthen the conceptual model in order to develop 'best practices' to foster civility in nursing education.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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