2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157474
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SAFER SEX PROGRAMS FOR MIDLIFE AND OLDER MSM
Abstract:
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SAFER SEX PROGRAMS FOR MIDLIFE AND OLDER MSM
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Coon, David, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Maureen K. Keaveny
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore 1) the sexual behavior, including HIV/STD risk behavior, of midlife and older (age 50 and older) men who have sex with men (MSM) and 2) the healthy aging program preferences, including safer sex programs, of this population.
BACKGROUND: According to the CDC, midlife and older adults account for 15% of new HIV diagnosis and 19% of new AIDS diagnosis. Additionally, midlife and older adults comprise 24% of those living with HIV and 29% living with AIDS as improved effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to greater longevity. Though 5-7% of men report having sex with men, MSM represent 68% of men living with HIV/AIDS. Previous studies have examined risk behavior of MSM while not accounting for potential differences between younger and midlife/older MSM.
METHODS: This study recruited San Francisco men age 50 and older from the Urban Men's Health Study, a probability-based telephone survey. A structured, telephone interview was administered addressing different factors, such as social support networks, leisure activities, life satisfaction, and ageism, in addition to sexual & risk behaviors and healthy aging program preferences. Differences between MSM with and without partners were analyzed; and, predictors of risky behavior were identified for MSM with a current or recent sexual partner. Program formatting (e.g. discussion groups vs. presentations), mentoring opportunities (e.g. group or individuals), target population (e.g. only MSM age 50+ vs. everyone), design source (e.g. by professionals), information distribution (e.g. print vs. online media), and content (e.g. social or health concerns) were also explored.
RESULTS: Findings suggest MSM with a sexual partner differ significantly from those without a sexual partner in several key domains including ageism, social activity and connectedness, emotional well-being, and physical & sexual health. Further exploration among MSM with recent sexual partners identified several significant predictors of high risk behavior including having a main partner, sexual performance enhancer use, time since testing for serostatus, life satisfaction, loneliness, and beliefs regarding barebacking. This study also analyzed participant preferences for healthy aging programs and revealed significant differences between HIV positive and HIV negative participants. For example, midlife/older MSM who were HIV positive preferred programs that chronicled life experiences of midlife/older MSM, included discussion groups regarding midlife/older MSM concerns and interests, utilized group mentoring, and were designed with input from gay men of all ages influenced likelihood of attending such programs.
IMPLICATIONS: This study highlights the importance of developing healthy aging programs tailored to meet the needs of midlife/older MSM in general as well as components tailored to meet the needs of HIV positive versus HIV negative individuals. Moreover, by integrating safer sex information into an overarching healthy aging program, such programs may be more appealing these two populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SAFER SEX PROGRAMS FOR MIDLIFE AND OLDER MSMen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157474-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SAFER SEX PROGRAMS FOR MIDLIFE AND OLDER MSM</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coon, David, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">david.w.coon@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Maureen K. Keaveny</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore 1) the sexual behavior, including HIV/STD risk behavior, of midlife and older (age 50 and older) men who have sex with men (MSM) and 2) the healthy aging program preferences, including safer sex programs, of this population. <br/>BACKGROUND: According to the CDC, midlife and older adults account for 15% of new HIV diagnosis and 19% of new AIDS diagnosis. Additionally, midlife and older adults comprise 24% of those living with HIV and 29% living with AIDS as improved effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to greater longevity. Though 5-7% of men report having sex with men, MSM represent 68% of men living with HIV/AIDS. Previous studies have examined risk behavior of MSM while not accounting for potential differences between younger and midlife/older MSM. <br/>METHODS: This study recruited San Francisco men age 50 and older from the Urban Men's Health Study, a probability-based telephone survey. A structured, telephone interview was administered addressing different factors, such as social support networks, leisure activities, life satisfaction, and ageism, in addition to sexual &amp; risk behaviors and healthy aging program preferences. Differences between MSM with and without partners were analyzed; and, predictors of risky behavior were identified for MSM with a current or recent sexual partner. Program formatting (e.g. discussion groups vs. presentations), mentoring opportunities (e.g. group or individuals), target population (e.g. only MSM age 50+ vs. everyone), design source (e.g. by professionals), information distribution (e.g. print vs. online media), and content (e.g. social or health concerns) were also explored. <br/>RESULTS: Findings suggest MSM with a sexual partner differ significantly from those without a sexual partner in several key domains including ageism, social activity and connectedness, emotional well-being, and physical &amp; sexual health. Further exploration among MSM with recent sexual partners identified several significant predictors of high risk behavior including having a main partner, sexual performance enhancer use, time since testing for serostatus, life satisfaction, loneliness, and beliefs regarding barebacking. This study also analyzed participant preferences for healthy aging programs and revealed significant differences between HIV positive and HIV negative participants. For example, midlife/older MSM who were HIV positive preferred programs that chronicled life experiences of midlife/older MSM, included discussion groups regarding midlife/older MSM concerns and interests, utilized group mentoring, and were designed with input from gay men of all ages influenced likelihood of attending such programs.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study highlights the importance of developing healthy aging programs tailored to meet the needs of midlife/older MSM in general as well as components tailored to meet the needs of HIV positive versus HIV negative individuals. Moreover, by integrating safer sex information into an overarching healthy aging program, such programs may be more appealing these two populations.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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