PREVALENCE OF INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE AMONG AFRO CARIBBEAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREVALENCE OF INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE AMONG AFRO CARIBBEAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Abstract:
PREVALENCE OF INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE AMONG AFRO CARIBBEAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Coverston, Catherine R., PhD, RNc
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:540 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Gloria Callwood; Doris W Campbell; Laura Sutton; Kelly Wight; Trista Jones; Jacquelyn Campbell; Jamila Stockman; Richelle Bolyard; Phyllis W. Sharps; M. Baty; M. Paterno; A. Johnson
PURPOSE The OBJECTIVE: of this study is to determine the prevalence of physical, emotional and/or sexual intimate partner abuse (IPA) and physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) among Afro- Caribbean women living in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) and a comparable group of African American women in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The research question is, ôWhat is the prevalence of physical, emotional, and/or sexual IPA and physical and/or sexual IPV among Afro-Caribbean women living in the USVI and a comparable group of African American women in Baltimore, Maryland?ö
BACKGROUND: Research thus far has demonstrated a high rate of IPV among African-American women. In the USVI, there is anecdotal evidence of a high rate of IPV for Afro-Caribbean women, but no systematic research has been done to document this phenomena.
METHODS: The study design is a case-control comparing 150 abused and 150 non-abused women USVI and comparable groups from Baltimore, Maryland. Women 18-55 of African descent who have had an intimate partner within the prior two years and are seeking care in prenatal and primary care clinics are eligible for participation. Eligible cases are women with a history of IPA or IPV and eligible controls are women without a history of IPA or IPV.
RESULTS: Of 431 women screened for participation 353 (81.9%) were eligible. Of the 353, 45.0% reported lifetime history of IPA and 25.2% experienced IPV in the past two years. Of 245 women in the USVI and 108 in Baltimore, 48.2% and 37.9% reported IPA, respectively; 27.8% and 19.4% reported IPV, respectively. Among 206 women in the USVI and 86 women in Baltimore with a current partner, 39.5% vs. 47.1% experienced IPA and 19.8% vs. 25.2% experienced IPV. There were no significant differences between IPA and IPV prevalence and site. Lifetime IPA and recent IPV are prevalent among women of African descent in the USVI and Baltimore. IMPLICATIONS: Knowledge about rates of IPA, IPV and related variables can assist in planning health care policies and interventions to reduce health disparities and medical costs associated with IPA and IPV. The added privacy of using computers for data collection has resulted in a higher report of incidence of IPA and IPV than previously described. This method should be further analyzed to determine its effectiveness in encouraging individuals to reveal sensitive information they would be less likely to reveal in traditional interviews.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREVALENCE OF INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE AMONG AFRO CARIBBEAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREVALENCE OF INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE AMONG AFRO CARIBBEAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coverston, Catherine R., PhD, RNc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">540 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catherine_coverston@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gloria Callwood; Doris W Campbell; Laura Sutton; Kelly Wight; Trista Jones; Jacquelyn Campbell; Jamila Stockman; Richelle Bolyard; Phyllis W. Sharps; M. Baty; M. Paterno; A. Johnson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE The OBJECTIVE: of this study is to determine the prevalence of physical, emotional and/or sexual intimate partner abuse (IPA) and physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) among Afro- Caribbean women living in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) and a comparable group of African American women in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The research question is, &ocirc;What is the prevalence of physical, emotional, and/or sexual IPA and physical and/or sexual IPV among Afro-Caribbean women living in the USVI and a comparable group of African American women in Baltimore, Maryland?&ouml; <br/>BACKGROUND: Research thus far has demonstrated a high rate of IPV among African-American women. In the USVI, there is anecdotal evidence of a high rate of IPV for Afro-Caribbean women, but no systematic research has been done to document this phenomena. <br/>METHODS: The study design is a case-control comparing 150 abused and 150 non-abused women USVI and comparable groups from Baltimore, Maryland. Women 18-55 of African descent who have had an intimate partner within the prior two years and are seeking care in prenatal and primary care clinics are eligible for participation. Eligible cases are women with a history of IPA or IPV and eligible controls are women without a history of IPA or IPV. <br/>RESULTS: Of 431 women screened for participation 353 (81.9%) were eligible. Of the 353, 45.0% reported lifetime history of IPA and 25.2% experienced IPV in the past two years. Of 245 women in the USVI and 108 in Baltimore, 48.2% and 37.9% reported IPA, respectively; 27.8% and 19.4% reported IPV, respectively. Among 206 women in the USVI and 86 women in Baltimore with a current partner, 39.5% vs. 47.1% experienced IPA and 19.8% vs. 25.2% experienced IPV. There were no significant differences between IPA and IPV prevalence and site. Lifetime IPA and recent IPV are prevalent among women of African descent in the USVI and Baltimore. IMPLICATIONS: Knowledge about rates of IPA, IPV and related variables can assist in planning health care policies and interventions to reduce health disparities and medical costs associated with IPA and IPV. The added privacy of using computers for data collection has resulted in a higher report of incidence of IPA and IPV than previously described. This method should be further analyzed to determine its effectiveness in encouraging individuals to reveal sensitive information they would be less likely to reveal in traditional interviews.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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