SYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE LATE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION STAGE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157476
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE LATE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION STAGE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS
Abstract:
SYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE LATE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION STAGE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Cray, Lori A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:901 12th Ave, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, WA, USA
Co-Authors:Nancy Woods; Ellen Mitchell
PURPOSES/AIMS: To identify subgroups of women in late menopausal transition (MT) stage who experienced the same cluster of symptoms and to identify indicators that predicted membership in these distinct subgroups.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The number of women reaching menopause grows exponentially each year. An expected 40 million women will reach menopause in the next decade. Approximately 65% - 75% of these women will experience bothersome vasomotor symptoms (VMS), an estimated 85% will report one or more symptoms such as hot flashes, mood disturbances or sleep disruption. To date menopausal symptom management research has focused on single symptoms. However, a majority of women report multiple symptoms varying in severity from mild to severe. Understanding the interrelationships among symptoms is an important first step to improve symptom management. To do this we need to not only focus our attention on the clustering of symptoms but on how women with the same symptom profiles cluster together.
METHODS: The sample consisted of a subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who were in late MT stage and provided self-report data on symptoms experienced between 1990 and 2005. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of women who experienced similar clusters of the following 5 symptoms: problem concentrating, hot flashes, joint ache, mood changes, and awakening at night. LCA with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify covariates that predicted membership in each subgroup.
RESULTS: Four subgroups of women were identified: 1) low severity for all symptoms except for joint ache which was moderate (65%); 2) high severity for all symptoms except for hot flashes which was moderate (13%); 3) high severity for hot flashes, joint ache and awakening at night; low severity for mood changes and problem concentrating (12%); 4) high severity for problem concentrating, joint ache; moderate severity for hot flashes and awakening at night; low severity for mood changes (10%). A clear delineation between subgroups based on individual characteristics was not fully elucidated.
IMPLICATIONS: Shifting the focus from single symptoms to symptom clusters will facilitate the identification of the unique symptom experience for individual women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE LATE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION STAGE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSISen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157476-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE LATE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION STAGE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cray, Lori A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">901 12th Ave, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, WA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">crayl@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Woods; Ellen Mitchell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: To identify subgroups of women in late menopausal transition (MT) stage who experienced the same cluster of symptoms and to identify indicators that predicted membership in these distinct subgroups.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The number of women reaching menopause grows exponentially each year. An expected 40 million women will reach menopause in the next decade. Approximately 65% - 75% of these women will experience bothersome vasomotor symptoms (VMS), an estimated 85% will report one or more symptoms such as hot flashes, mood disturbances or sleep disruption. To date menopausal symptom management research has focused on single symptoms. However, a majority of women report multiple symptoms varying in severity from mild to severe. Understanding the interrelationships among symptoms is an important first step to improve symptom management. To do this we need to not only focus our attention on the clustering of symptoms but on how women with the same symptom profiles cluster together.<br/>METHODS: The sample consisted of a subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who were in late MT stage and provided self-report data on symptoms experienced between 1990 and 2005. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of women who experienced similar clusters of the following 5 symptoms: problem concentrating, hot flashes, joint ache, mood changes, and awakening at night. LCA with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify covariates that predicted membership in each subgroup.<br/>RESULTS: Four subgroups of women were identified: 1) low severity for all symptoms except for joint ache which was moderate (65%); 2) high severity for all symptoms except for hot flashes which was moderate (13%); 3) high severity for hot flashes, joint ache and awakening at night; low severity for mood changes and problem concentrating (12%); 4) high severity for problem concentrating, joint ache; moderate severity for hot flashes and awakening at night; low severity for mood changes (10%). A clear delineation between subgroups based on individual characteristics was not fully elucidated.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Shifting the focus from single symptoms to symptom clusters will facilitate the identification of the unique symptom experience for individual women. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.