PRCEPTIONS OF GIVING BIRTH AND ADHERENCE TO CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHINESE WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157477
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PRCEPTIONS OF GIVING BIRTH AND ADHERENCE TO CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHINESE WOMEN
Abstract:
PRCEPTIONS OF GIVING BIRTH AND ADHERENCE TO CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHINESE WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Cutler, Megan, Student Nurse
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Student Nurse
Contact Address:136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Lynn Callister
PURPOSE The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the childbirth experiences and adherence to cultural practices in Chinese women living in Taiwan.
BACKGROUND: Chinese childbearing women living in Taiwan espouse cultural beliefs and practices, including the common practice of "doing the month" after giving birth. Similar practices can also be found in Japan, South Korea, the People's Republic of China (PRC), Thailand, and Cambodia. There are an increasing number of immigrants from Asia living in the United States, and it is important that nurses provide culturally competent care for Asian childbearing women and other culturally diverse women.
METHOD: Fourteen Chinese women living in Taiwan and four Chinese women from Taiwan who had immigrated to the western United States were interviewed following informed consent. These women had given birth in the 15 months to a healthy term infant. Audio-taped interviews were conducted in either Mandarin Chinese or English depending on the preference of the mother. Interviews were transcribed and translated and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Data collection proceeded concurrently with data analysis. The investigators reviewed and analyzed the transcripts, identifying themes that arose from the narrative data. Member checks were done electronically to verify preliminary themes and clarify questions of the interviews which were identified during data analysis. Trustworthiness of the data was ensured.
RESULTS: Themes included expecting a child; defining birth expectations; experiencing giving birth; and sitting or doing the month. Although the one-child policy in the PRC is not applicable in Taiwan and women can chose family size, the profoundness of the birth experience was identified. "Childbirth is an experience of life. It makes it so you can be a mother. It helps fulfill the purpose of being a woman." Despite Taiwan being highly westernized, Chinese childbearing women practice many Chinese rituals and customs that many nurses may not be aware of including the practice of "doing the month." Although the extent to which these cultural practices are adhered to varied, almost all Chinese women in Taiwan and those living in the United States follow them to some degree to avoid getting a "month disease." One woman said, "My mother-in-law said I shouldn't wash my hair." I heard a lot of examples of people who washed their hair and their head really hurt when they were 40 or 50 years old. During the month I was amazing. I didn't wash my hair at all.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Each culture has different beliefs and practices surrounding childbirth, and because there is such rich cultural diversity in the United States, it is important for nurses caring for childbearing women to understand Chinese cultural beliefs and practices so they can provide culturally competent care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePRCEPTIONS OF GIVING BIRTH AND ADHERENCE TO CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHINESE WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157477-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PRCEPTIONS OF GIVING BIRTH AND ADHERENCE TO CULTURAL PRACTICES IN CHINESE WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cutler, Megan, Student Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">megancutler@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Callister</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the childbirth experiences and adherence to cultural practices in Chinese women living in Taiwan. <br/>BACKGROUND: Chinese childbearing women living in Taiwan espouse cultural beliefs and practices, including the common practice of &quot;doing the month&quot; after giving birth. Similar practices can also be found in Japan, South Korea, the People's Republic of China (PRC), Thailand, and Cambodia. There are an increasing number of immigrants from Asia living in the United States, and it is important that nurses provide culturally competent care for Asian childbearing women and other culturally diverse women. <br/>METHOD: Fourteen Chinese women living in Taiwan and four Chinese women from Taiwan who had immigrated to the western United States were interviewed following informed consent. These women had given birth in the 15 months to a healthy term infant. Audio-taped interviews were conducted in either Mandarin Chinese or English depending on the preference of the mother. Interviews were transcribed and translated and analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Data collection proceeded concurrently with data analysis. The investigators reviewed and analyzed the transcripts, identifying themes that arose from the narrative data. Member checks were done electronically to verify preliminary themes and clarify questions of the interviews which were identified during data analysis. Trustworthiness of the data was ensured. <br/>RESULTS: Themes included expecting a child; defining birth expectations; experiencing giving birth; and sitting or doing the month. Although the one-child policy in the PRC is not applicable in Taiwan and women can chose family size, the profoundness of the birth experience was identified. &quot;Childbirth is an experience of life. It makes it so you can be a mother. It helps fulfill the purpose of being a woman.&quot; Despite Taiwan being highly westernized, Chinese childbearing women practice many Chinese rituals and customs that many nurses may not be aware of including the practice of &quot;doing the month.&quot; Although the extent to which these cultural practices are adhered to varied, almost all Chinese women in Taiwan and those living in the United States follow them to some degree to avoid getting a &quot;month disease.&quot; One woman said, &quot;My mother-in-law said I shouldn't wash my hair.&quot; I heard a lot of examples of people who washed their hair and their head really hurt when they were 40 or 50 years old. During the month I was amazing. I didn't wash my hair at all. <br/>IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Each culture has different beliefs and practices surrounding childbirth, and because there is such rich cultural diversity in the United States, it is important for nurses caring for childbearing women to understand Chinese cultural beliefs and practices so they can provide culturally competent care.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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