2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EARLY ADOLESCENT SCREEN TIME IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Abstract:
EARLY ADOLESCENT SCREEN TIME IN THE TEAMS PROJECT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Daratha, Kenneth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The aims of this study, which is part of the larger Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) project, were to: 1) measure recreational screen time in early adolescence, and 2) examine factors associated with excessive recreational screen time among early adolescents.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Nearly a third of early adolescents spend four or more hours every day in sedentary behaviors including playing computer games and watching television; this is twice the recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics of two hours or less. The prevalence of obesity in adolescents has been steadily increasing in the United States. It is hypothesized that sedentary behavior may be associated with early adolescent obesity. Sedentary behavior can be described as "productive" or "recreational" depending on the purpose of the behavior. School work and reading are considered productive, whereas video games and television viewing are recreational behaviors. The focus of this research was recreational sedentary activities. The study hypothesis was that a positive relationship existed between sedentary behavior and obesity.
METHODS:
Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Physical measurements, assessments, and behavioral questionnaires were administered at baseline as research participants entered 7th grade. Five questions related to television viewing (school day, weekends and summer time) were selected from the TEAMS physical activity and screen time questionnaire. Principal component analysis (PCA) explored the factor structure of a measure designed to assess television viewing to determine the components of this construct. Independent samples t-tests were used to explore group mean differences of the aggregated measure for television viewing and gender, weight status, activity status and school lunch status (i.e., free and reduced lunch program).
RESULTS:
Participants included 7th grade middle school students (N = 165, 58% female, 42% male) with an overall moderate measurement of socioeconomic status (mean Hollingshead index 38.9). PCA indicated a single factor termed "television viewing" that was comprised of all five television viewing questions with all loadings greater than 0.8. This single component explains 71.86% of the variance in this dataset. Cronbach's alpha, a measure of the internal consistent reliability of this measure was .901. Those who participated in free and reduced lunch (p<.01) and those with obesity status measured at the 95th body mass index percentile (p<.05) had higher aggregate television viewing. No differences were observed by activity status and gender.
IMPLICATIONS:
Many adolescents exceed recommendations for amount of television viewing. Interventions addressing reductions in screen time should be targeted to sub-groups most likely to exhibit excessive amounts of television screen time, namely obese youth and youth of lower socioeconomic status.
This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEARLY ADOLESCENT SCREEN TIME IN THE TEAMS PROJECTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EARLY ADOLESCENT SCREEN TIME IN THE TEAMS PROJECT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Daratha, Kenneth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">103 E Spokane Falls Blvd, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kdaratha@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The aims of this study, which is part of the larger Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) project, were to: 1) measure recreational screen time in early adolescence, and 2) examine factors associated with excessive recreational screen time among early adolescents. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Nearly a third of early adolescents spend four or more hours every day in sedentary behaviors including playing computer games and watching television; this is twice the recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics of two hours or less. The prevalence of obesity in adolescents has been steadily increasing in the United States. It is hypothesized that sedentary behavior may be associated with early adolescent obesity. Sedentary behavior can be described as &quot;productive&quot; or &quot;recreational&quot; depending on the purpose of the behavior. School work and reading are considered productive, whereas video games and television viewing are recreational behaviors. The focus of this research was recreational sedentary activities. The study hypothesis was that a positive relationship existed between sedentary behavior and obesity.<br/>METHODS: <br/>Following university and school district IRB approval, students from four public middle schools were recruited to participate in the TEAMS project. Physical measurements, assessments, and behavioral questionnaires were administered at baseline as research participants entered 7th grade. Five questions related to television viewing (school day, weekends and summer time) were selected from the TEAMS physical activity and screen time questionnaire. Principal component analysis (PCA) explored the factor structure of a measure designed to assess television viewing to determine the components of this construct. Independent samples t-tests were used to explore group mean differences of the aggregated measure for television viewing and gender, weight status, activity status and school lunch status (i.e., free and reduced lunch program).<br/>RESULTS: <br/>Participants included 7th grade middle school students (N = 165, 58% female, 42% male) with an overall moderate measurement of socioeconomic status (mean Hollingshead index 38.9). PCA indicated a single factor termed &quot;television viewing&quot; that was comprised of all five television viewing questions with all loadings greater than 0.8. This single component explains 71.86% of the variance in this dataset. Cronbach's alpha, a measure of the internal consistent reliability of this measure was .901. Those who participated in free and reduced lunch (p&lt;.01) and those with obesity status measured at the 95th body mass index percentile (p&lt;.05) had higher aggregate television viewing. No differences were observed by activity status and gender.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Many adolescents exceed recommendations for amount of television viewing. Interventions addressing reductions in screen time should be targeted to sub-groups most likely to exhibit excessive amounts of television screen time, namely obese youth and youth of lower socioeconomic status.<br/> This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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