2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157480
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RECOGNITION OF MORAL DISTRESS AMONG A CONVENIENCE SAMPLE OF IDAHO NURSES
Abstract:
RECOGNITION OF MORAL DISTRESS AMONG A CONVENIENCE SAMPLE OF IDAHO NURSES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Davis, Shoni K., RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Boise State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1910 University Dr., Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA
Co-Authors:Vivian Schrader
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study was to explore how a convenience sample of Idaho nurses (RNs and LPNs) perceives issues associated with moral distress. Also of interest was whether the nursing code of ethics is perceived as a useful tool in addressing morally distressing situations among the sample.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
In today's work force, nurses face moral distress in maintaining their personal morals and conscience while at the same time carrying out their duty to the patient. Moral distress, defined for this study as knowing the right thing to do but being unable to perform the morally correct action because of institutional constraints, can lead to decreased coping and self-esteem in nurses and ultimately to an inability to give good patient care. Furthermore, moral distress can lead to burnout among nurses and impact attrition.
METHODS:
The researchers developed a survey to explore recognition of moral distress and types of situations that result in moral conflict among a convenience sample of 1500 RNs and 848 LPNs Idaho nurses. A partnership between the BSU Nursing Department and the Idaho State Board of Nursing (ISBON) allowed the researchers to access the nurse license renewal process to collect survey data. Descriptive statistics were used to identify moral distress, types of morally distressing situations, and whether the code of ethics is perceived to be useful in guiding nursing practice and correlational statistics were used to explore associations between moral distress and demographic variables among the sample.
RESULTS:
While only 15% of the sample identified having experienced moral distress in relation to their nursing practice nearly 33% of the sample perceived moral distress as a cause of burn-out among their co-workers. Sixty-five percent of the sample did not believe that they should be required to provide patient care that is against their religious or moral values except in life-threatening emergencies even though the majority identified the nursing code of ethics as a useful tool to guide nursing practice. Although nearly half of Idaho nurses work in rural settings, they did not perceive moral distress significantly different from nurses who work in urban settings.
IMPLICATIONS:
Scant literature exists that inform educators and healthcare leaders in Idaho about issues related to moral distress among Idaho nurses and its potential impact on patient care and nursing attrition. This is an important topic concerning the Idaho nursing work-force since nearly half of Idaho nurses work in rural settings where they are often isolated and required to make independent decisions about health care delivery. While experiencing similar stressors as nurses who work in urban settings, rural nurses tend to experience a higher frequency and degree of intensity of stress, thus making them more prone to moral distress. Further research is needed to explore how issues of moral distress impact nurses in various settings and clinical situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRECOGNITION OF MORAL DISTRESS AMONG A CONVENIENCE SAMPLE OF IDAHO NURSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157480-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RECOGNITION OF MORAL DISTRESS AMONG A CONVENIENCE SAMPLE OF IDAHO NURSES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Shoni K., RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boise State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1910 University Dr., Boise, ID, 83725-1840, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shonidavis@boisestate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Vivian Schrader</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this study was to explore how a convenience sample of Idaho nurses (RNs and LPNs) perceives issues associated with moral distress. Also of interest was whether the nursing code of ethics is perceived as a useful tool in addressing morally distressing situations among the sample.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>In today's work force, nurses face moral distress in maintaining their personal morals and conscience while at the same time carrying out their duty to the patient. Moral distress, defined for this study as knowing the right thing to do but being unable to perform the morally correct action because of institutional constraints, can lead to decreased coping and self-esteem in nurses and ultimately to an inability to give good patient care. Furthermore, moral distress can lead to burnout among nurses and impact attrition.<br/>METHODS: <br/>The researchers developed a survey to explore recognition of moral distress and types of situations that result in moral conflict among a convenience sample of 1500 RNs and 848 LPNs Idaho nurses. A partnership between the BSU Nursing Department and the Idaho State Board of Nursing (ISBON) allowed the researchers to access the nurse license renewal process to collect survey data. Descriptive statistics were used to identify moral distress, types of morally distressing situations, and whether the code of ethics is perceived to be useful in guiding nursing practice and correlational statistics were used to explore associations between moral distress and demographic variables among the sample.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>While only 15% of the sample identified having experienced moral distress in relation to their nursing practice nearly 33% of the sample perceived moral distress as a cause of burn-out among their co-workers. Sixty-five percent of the sample did not believe that they should be required to provide patient care that is against their religious or moral values except in life-threatening emergencies even though the majority identified the nursing code of ethics as a useful tool to guide nursing practice. Although nearly half of Idaho nurses work in rural settings, they did not perceive moral distress significantly different from nurses who work in urban settings.<br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>Scant literature exists that inform educators and healthcare leaders in Idaho about issues related to moral distress among Idaho nurses and its potential impact on patient care and nursing attrition. This is an important topic concerning the Idaho nursing work-force since nearly half of Idaho nurses work in rural settings where they are often isolated and required to make independent decisions about health care delivery. While experiencing similar stressors as nurses who work in urban settings, rural nurses tend to experience a higher frequency and degree of intensity of stress, thus making them more prone to moral distress. Further research is needed to explore how issues of moral distress impact nurses in various settings and clinical situations. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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