2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157483
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE IN ADMISSION & PROGRESSION POLICY DECISIONS
Abstract:
EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE IN ADMISSION & PROGRESSION POLICY DECISIONS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:DeLapp, Tina D., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alaska Anchorage
Title:Emerita Professor
Contact Address:13101 Elmore Road, Anchorage, AK, 99516-2910, US Virgin Islands
BACKGROUND: The literature is replete with articles on effective METHODS: of selecting students likely to be successful in completing nursing education programs. Evidence of systematic evaluation of the impact of changing existing admission or progression standards in advance of adoption are lacking. Nurse educators are challenged to employ evidence in their practice arena, i.e., the nursing education arena. The purpose of this study was to examine use of existing data to anticipate the impact of changing admission and progression/retention policies on the graduation and NCLEX pass rates of baccalaureate nursing students and on characteristics of graduates.
METHOD: The records of all baccalaureate nursing students admitted to the clinical major in a public baccalaureate program from January 1997-Summer 2005 were examined. The sample was predominately female, Caucasian, single, 19-30 years old, and without a prior 4-year degree or a parent with a college degree. 594 (93.1%) successfully completed the degree; 585 (98.4%) eventually were successful on NCLEX, the majority (91.1%) on first attempt. The potential impact of raising the following admission and progression standards were examined: required extracted admission GPA, required science GPA, and number of allowable nursing course repeats.
RESULTS: When the extracted admission GPA was increased from 2.7 to 3.0, the number of graduates would was reduced (n=136; 21.3%). There was no significant impact on gender, marital status, ethnicity, or age of graduates; however, students whose parents had no degree were significantly less likely to be admitted and graduate compared to those whose parents had attained a degree (x2 = 5.25, p = 0.21). There was no significant difference in the first attempt or eventual NCLEX pass rates of students with an extracted admission GPA of more or less than 3.0 (x2 = 5.97, p = 0.16; x2 = 5.83, p = 0.44, respectively). There was no significant difference in graduation rates of ethnic minority students with higher or lower GPAs, although the number of minority graduates were lower for the following ethnic minorities: Asian-Pacific Islander (decrease 26%), Black (decrease 26%), Hispanic (decrease 39%), & Alaska Native/American Indian (decrease 22%). There was a significant difference in graduation rates of students who had a science GPA of less and more than 3.0 (x2 = 4.93, p = 0.026). Students who self-identified as being ethnic minority were more likely to have a sciences GPA of less than 3.0 (x2 = 10.02, p = 0.002). Also, the first time NCLEX pass rates were significantly lower among those with a lower science GPAs (47% vs. 53%) (x2 = 4.6.28, p = 0.12). Limiting the number of second attempts on any nursing course revealed that only one graduate who required more than two re-enrollments had required a second attempt to pass NCLEX.
IMPLICATIONS: The results make clear that, when higher admission & progression standards are proposed, it is indeed possible to utilize existing data to anticipate their impact. Nursing faculty would do well to base such change decisions on evidence to avoid being surprised by unanticipated outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE IN ADMISSION & PROGRESSION POLICY DECISIONSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157483-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE IN ADMISSION &amp; PROGRESSION POLICY DECISIONS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeLapp, Tina D., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alaska Anchorage</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emerita Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13101 Elmore Road, Anchorage, AK, 99516-2910, US Virgin Islands</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tdelapp@ak.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: The literature is replete with articles on effective METHODS: of selecting students likely to be successful in completing nursing education programs. Evidence of systematic evaluation of the impact of changing existing admission or progression standards in advance of adoption are lacking. Nurse educators are challenged to employ evidence in their practice arena, i.e., the nursing education arena. The purpose of this study was to examine use of existing data to anticipate the impact of changing admission and progression/retention policies on the graduation and NCLEX pass rates of baccalaureate nursing students and on characteristics of graduates.<br/>METHOD: The records of all baccalaureate nursing students admitted to the clinical major in a public baccalaureate program from January 1997-Summer 2005 were examined. The sample was predominately female, Caucasian, single, 19-30 years old, and without a prior 4-year degree or a parent with a college degree. 594 (93.1%) successfully completed the degree; 585 (98.4%) eventually were successful on NCLEX, the majority (91.1%) on first attempt. The potential impact of raising the following admission and progression standards were examined: required extracted admission GPA, required science GPA, and number of allowable nursing course repeats. <br/>RESULTS: When the extracted admission GPA was increased from 2.7 to 3.0, the number of graduates would was reduced (n=136; 21.3%). There was no significant impact on gender, marital status, ethnicity, or age of graduates; however, students whose parents had no degree were significantly less likely to be admitted and graduate compared to those whose parents had attained a degree (x2 = 5.25, p = 0.21). There was no significant difference in the first attempt or eventual NCLEX pass rates of students with an extracted admission GPA of more or less than 3.0 (x2 = 5.97, p = 0.16; x2 = 5.83, p = 0.44, respectively). There was no significant difference in graduation rates of ethnic minority students with higher or lower GPAs, although the number of minority graduates were lower for the following ethnic minorities: Asian-Pacific Islander (decrease 26%), Black (decrease 26%), Hispanic (decrease 39%), &amp; Alaska Native/American Indian (decrease 22%). There was a significant difference in graduation rates of students who had a science GPA of less and more than 3.0 (x2 = 4.93, p = 0.026). Students who self-identified as being ethnic minority were more likely to have a sciences GPA of less than 3.0 (x2 = 10.02, p = 0.002). Also, the first time NCLEX pass rates were significantly lower among those with a lower science GPAs (47% vs. 53%) (x2 = 4.6.28, p = 0.12). Limiting the number of second attempts on any nursing course revealed that only one graduate who required more than two re-enrollments had required a second attempt to pass NCLEX.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The results make clear that, when higher admission &amp; progression standards are proposed, it is indeed possible to utilize existing data to anticipate their impact. Nursing faculty would do well to base such change decisions on evidence to avoid being surprised by unanticipated outcomes.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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