2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157485
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPLORING PTSD DURING THE PRENATAL PERIOD IN A LOW INCOME COMMUNITY
Abstract:
EXPLORING PTSD DURING THE PRENATAL PERIOD IN A LOW INCOME COMMUNITY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Dodgson, Joan E., PhD, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1041 E. Orangewood Ave, Phoenix, AZ, 85020, USA
Co-Authors:Mary F. Oneha
PURPOSES/AIMS:
To compare demographic, social and health-related variables between prenatal women who do not screen positive for PTSD with prenatal women who have screened positive for PTSD and to explore the relationships among demographic, social and health-related variables in prenatal women who screen positive for PTSD and those who do not screen positive.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Women during their childbearing year (prenatally and postpartum) have been identified as a group that may be grossly under diagnosed. It is more likely that the primary care provider will have contact with these women than will any mental health provider. However, perinatal women may consider PTSD symptoms outside the realm of interest of the obstetrical primary care provider and not mention them. Risk factors associated with PTSD in the prenatal population are just beginning to be researched; however, no such work has been done with Asian American and Pacific Islander populations. The occurrence of PTSD in prenatal women is unclear, as screening is far from universal.
METHODS:
A case-controlled design was used to gather retrospective data from the medical records of women receiving prenatal care from Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center in Waianae, Oahu in Hawaii. Sample selection criteria were (1) received case management services due to perinatal risk factors and (2) are over 20 years of age. The power analysis was met. The group of women who screened positive for PTSD (n = 68) were matched on marital status and ethnicity with the control group (n = 108).
RESULTS: Data from both groups were summarized with frequency distributions and descriptive statistics. Mean age control group was 25.64 (4.43) years and case group was 26.14 (5.13) years (t = .667; p = .50) with an age range = 20 û 40 years. The predictors of PTSD (physical trauma, lack of family support, family stress, depression, CPS involvement, perinatal loss, parity of two or more, and substance abuse) were first examined separately (one model for each) via chi-square tests, and then simultaneously (all in the same model) via logistic regression. Physical trauma, lack of family support, family stress and depression were statistically significant (p < .05) in both models.
IMPLICATIONS: PTSD screening is important in high risk populations. If a screen is positive appropriate services need to be available.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPLORING PTSD DURING THE PRENATAL PERIOD IN A LOW INCOME COMMUNITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157485-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EXPLORING PTSD DURING THE PRENATAL PERIOD IN A LOW INCOME COMMUNITY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dodgson, Joan E., PhD, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1041 E. Orangewood Ave, Phoenix, AZ, 85020, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdodgson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary F. Oneha</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>To compare demographic, social and health-related variables between prenatal women who do not screen positive for PTSD with prenatal women who have screened positive for PTSD and to explore the relationships among demographic, social and health-related variables in prenatal women who screen positive for PTSD and those who do not screen positive.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Women during their childbearing year (prenatally and postpartum) have been identified as a group that may be grossly under diagnosed. It is more likely that the primary care provider will have contact with these women than will any mental health provider. However, perinatal women may consider PTSD symptoms outside the realm of interest of the obstetrical primary care provider and not mention them. Risk factors associated with PTSD in the prenatal population are just beginning to be researched; however, no such work has been done with Asian American and Pacific Islander populations. The occurrence of PTSD in prenatal women is unclear, as screening is far from universal. <br/>METHODS: <br/>A case-controlled design was used to gather retrospective data from the medical records of women receiving prenatal care from Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center in Waianae, Oahu in Hawaii. Sample selection criteria were (1) received case management services due to perinatal risk factors and (2) are over 20 years of age. The power analysis was met. The group of women who screened positive for PTSD (n = 68) were matched on marital status and ethnicity with the control group (n = 108). <br/>RESULTS: Data from both groups were summarized with frequency distributions and descriptive statistics. Mean age control group was 25.64 (4.43) years and case group was 26.14 (5.13) years (t = .667; p = .50) with an age range = 20 &ucirc; 40 years. The predictors of PTSD (physical trauma, lack of family support, family stress, depression, CPS involvement, perinatal loss, parity of two or more, and substance abuse) were first examined separately (one model for each) via chi-square tests, and then simultaneously (all in the same model) via logistic regression. Physical trauma, lack of family support, family stress and depression were statistically significant (p &lt; .05) in both models. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: PTSD screening is important in high risk populations. If a screen is positive appropriate services need to be available.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:54:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:54:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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