2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157487
Type:
Presentation
Title:
OH, THEIR ACHING BACKS! OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN NURSING ASSISTANTS
Abstract:
OH, THEIR ACHING BACKS! OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN NURSING ASSISTANTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Dougherty, Jacalyn P., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Assistant, Professor
Contact Address:UNC Gunter Hall Room 3280, Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80649, USA
Co-Authors:Patricia Graham
PURPOSE/AIM: This descriptive study explored the incidence of self-reported, work-related back injury in a randomly selected sample of certified nurse aides (CNAs) participating in a postal survey. Names and addresses were obtained from a State Board registry of Certified Nursing Assistants in a western state in the US.
BACKGROUND: A number of studies have been conducted to identify the prevalence of back injury in nurses who are recognized world-wide as being among the highest of any professional health care group in their rates of manual handling injuries (Garrett, Singiser, & Banks, 1992; Trinkoff, Brady, & Nielsen, 2003). However, little research focuses on injuries sustained by nurse aides in spite of the fact that this group is at greater risk for back injuries than nurses (Hoff & Slatin, 2006; Li, Wolf, & Evenoff, 2004). This finding is likely related to the fact that nurse aides, on average, perform twice the amount of lifting, bending, and rotation in delivering patient care services than do nurses (Videman, Nurminen, Tola, Kuorinka, Vanharanta, & Troup, 1984). The increasing numbers of overweight and obese patients are likely to compound this problem. Owen (2000) noted that 12% of nurses reported back pain as a factor that influenced their intent to leave nursing, but no such estimates were found in the literature about similar experiences in nurse aides. It is likely that the number of aides who leave their careers due to back injury is even higher due to the increased manual labor work load encountered. And, since CNAs often have little actual or perceived power within the health care system, they might well expect that refusing to perform services that place them at risk for injury, such as lifting heavy patients, might put their jobs in jeopardy.
METHODS: Using systematic random sampling, the names of 200 individuals were selected from the State Board of Nursing's public CNA list and mailed a survey packet written at an 11th grade reading level. Thirty-five individuals completed the 19-item survey concerning whether or not they had incurred injuries while working as CNAs.
RESULTS: Of the 200 surveys mailed, 35 (17.5%) were returned. Almost 46% (n = 16) of the 35 respondents reported having hurt themselves while lifting, moving, or helping a patient, with 40% (n = 14) of these individuals specifically reporting having suffered back injuries. Eleven of the 14 respondents (11%) who reported having ever injured their backs reported working in nursing homes at the time the injury occurred. Further, a not insignificant number of respondents identified less than ideal working relationships between CNAs and nurses--17% reported they felt "looked down on" by the nurses or had poor relationships with the RNs with whom they worked.
CONCLUSIONS: The high proportion of CNAs reporting a work-related injury occurring while lifting or moving a patient is cause for alarm and demonstrates a need for further research on rates of injury in this population. Findings suggest the particular dangers of moving and lifting patients while working in nursing home environments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOH, THEIR ACHING BACKS! OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN NURSING ASSISTANTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157487-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">OH, THEIR ACHING BACKS! OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN NURSING ASSISTANTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dougherty, Jacalyn P., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant, Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">UNC Gunter Hall Room 3280, Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80649, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacalyn.dougherty@unco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Graham</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIM: This descriptive study explored the incidence of self-reported, work-related back injury in a randomly selected sample of certified nurse aides (CNAs) participating in a postal survey. Names and addresses were obtained from a State Board registry of Certified Nursing Assistants in a western state in the US. <br/>BACKGROUND: A number of studies have been conducted to identify the prevalence of back injury in nurses who are recognized world-wide as being among the highest of any professional health care group in their rates of manual handling injuries (Garrett, Singiser, &amp; Banks, 1992; Trinkoff, Brady, &amp; Nielsen, 2003). However, little research focuses on injuries sustained by nurse aides in spite of the fact that this group is at greater risk for back injuries than nurses (Hoff &amp; Slatin, 2006; Li, Wolf, &amp; Evenoff, 2004). This finding is likely related to the fact that nurse aides, on average, perform twice the amount of lifting, bending, and rotation in delivering patient care services than do nurses (Videman, Nurminen, Tola, Kuorinka, Vanharanta, &amp; Troup, 1984). The increasing numbers of overweight and obese patients are likely to compound this problem. Owen (2000) noted that 12% of nurses reported back pain as a factor that influenced their intent to leave nursing, but no such estimates were found in the literature about similar experiences in nurse aides. It is likely that the number of aides who leave their careers due to back injury is even higher due to the increased manual labor work load encountered. And, since CNAs often have little actual or perceived power within the health care system, they might well expect that refusing to perform services that place them at risk for injury, such as lifting heavy patients, might put their jobs in jeopardy. <br/>METHODS: Using systematic random sampling, the names of 200 individuals were selected from the State Board of Nursing's public CNA list and mailed a survey packet written at an 11th grade reading level. Thirty-five individuals completed the 19-item survey concerning whether or not they had incurred injuries while working as CNAs. <br/>RESULTS: Of the 200 surveys mailed, 35 (17.5%) were returned. Almost 46% (n = 16) of the 35 respondents reported having hurt themselves while lifting, moving, or helping a patient, with 40% (n = 14) of these individuals specifically reporting having suffered back injuries. Eleven of the 14 respondents (11%) who reported having ever injured their backs reported working in nursing homes at the time the injury occurred. Further, a not insignificant number of respondents identified less than ideal working relationships between CNAs and nurses--17% reported they felt &quot;looked down on&quot; by the nurses or had poor relationships with the RNs with whom they worked. <br/>CONCLUSIONS: The high proportion of CNAs reporting a work-related injury occurring while lifting or moving a patient is cause for alarm and demonstrates a need for further research on rates of injury in this population. Findings suggest the particular dangers of moving and lifting patients while working in nursing home environments. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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