CULTURAL SAFETY: HELPING SITUATE RN-BSN FACULTY AND STUDENTS LOCALLY & GLOBALLY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157488
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CULTURAL SAFETY: HELPING SITUATE RN-BSN FACULTY AND STUDENTS LOCALLY & GLOBALLY
Abstract:
CULTURAL SAFETY: HELPING SITUATE RN-BSN FACULTY AND STUDENTS LOCALLY & GLOBALLY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Doutrich, Dawn, RN, PhD, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA
Co-Authors:Lida Dekker; Janet Spuck; Kari Arcus; Catherine Pollock-Robinson
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to explore how cultural safety, developed in Aotearoa, New Zealand, informs U.S. nursing education and specifically how cultural safety has been incorporated into RN to BSN curriculum
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The concept and practice of cultural safety emerged in Aotearoa New Zealand as a nursing response to the bicultural relationship between Maori, the indigenous people, and other New Zealanders. New Zealand nurses have been in the forefront of developing, articulating, and teaching cultural safety for two decades. Over five years ago, The College of Nursing began the process of a systematic curricular revision based on Morey and Kitano's work with multicultural transformation in higher education.
METHODS: A research study was designed using an interpretive, hermeneutic, qualitative design. The study process included interviews with 12 nurse participants describing their experiences of cultural safety in practice and education. Two U.S. nurse researchers traveled to New Zealand and were joined by a New Zealand nurse researcher to conduct the interviews. Participants were selected through snowball, purposive, and convenience sample methods.
RESULTS: Themes that emerged from the interviews include: the importance of knowing where you come from and telling your story; the significance of reflection; how cultural safety and the teaching about it has purposefully evolved over time; working to understand the experience of first peoples which includes situating the understandings within historical and sociopolitical contexts; "being alongside" or "looking at a way forward together" involve the essential nature of partnership in nursing and nursing education; the examination of power differentials, conflict, and "the learning that happens on the margins of discomfort;" tension between social justice for oppressed group members and others, expressed as an issue of equity versus equality; and motivation for cultural safety, which refers to a desire to be culturally safe in education and practice and includes anxiety about "getting it right."
IMPLICATIONS: Ways that these themes have been integrated into educational philosophy, courses, and concrete assignments in the RN-BSN program will be discussed. As the RN to BSN program has undergone curricular and faculty change, new ways of teaching about culture have been explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCULTURAL SAFETY: HELPING SITUATE RN-BSN FACULTY AND STUDENTS LOCALLY & GLOBALLYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157488-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CULTURAL SAFETY: HELPING SITUATE RN-BSN FACULTY AND STUDENTS LOCALLY &amp; GLOBALLY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doutrich, Dawn, RN, PhD, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">doutrich@vancouver.wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lida Dekker; Janet Spuck; Kari Arcus; Catherine Pollock-Robinson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to explore how cultural safety, developed in Aotearoa, New Zealand, informs U.S. nursing education and specifically how cultural safety has been incorporated into RN to BSN curriculum <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The concept and practice of cultural safety emerged in Aotearoa New Zealand as a nursing response to the bicultural relationship between Maori, the indigenous people, and other New Zealanders. New Zealand nurses have been in the forefront of developing, articulating, and teaching cultural safety for two decades. Over five years ago, The College of Nursing began the process of a systematic curricular revision based on Morey and Kitano's work with multicultural transformation in higher education. <br/>METHODS: A research study was designed using an interpretive, hermeneutic, qualitative design. The study process included interviews with 12 nurse participants describing their experiences of cultural safety in practice and education. Two U.S. nurse researchers traveled to New Zealand and were joined by a New Zealand nurse researcher to conduct the interviews. Participants were selected through snowball, purposive, and convenience sample methods. <br/>RESULTS: Themes that emerged from the interviews include: the importance of knowing where you come from and telling your story; the significance of reflection; how cultural safety and the teaching about it has purposefully evolved over time; working to understand the experience of first peoples which includes situating the understandings within historical and sociopolitical contexts; &quot;being alongside&quot; or &quot;looking at a way forward together&quot; involve the essential nature of partnership in nursing and nursing education; the examination of power differentials, conflict, and &quot;the learning that happens on the margins of discomfort;&quot; tension between social justice for oppressed group members and others, expressed as an issue of equity versus equality; and motivation for cultural safety, which refers to a desire to be culturally safe in education and practice and includes anxiety about &quot;getting it right.&quot; <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Ways that these themes have been integrated into educational philosophy, courses, and concrete assignments in the RN-BSN program will be discussed. As the RN to BSN program has undergone curricular and faculty change, new ways of teaching about culture have been explored. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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