2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157491
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WHAT CAN ORA REVEAL?
Abstract:
WHAT CAN ORA REVEAL?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Effken, Judith, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Denise Bianchi
PURPOSES/AIMS: We will report results of a study using a network analysis tool (ORA) to investigate how communication networks on nursing units might affect patient safety outcomes.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Communication is frequently implicated as contributing to patient safety issues (e.g., medication errors or falls). We used ORAORA is a computer-based network analysis tool for detecting risks or vulnerabilities in organizations (e.g., groupthink tendencies, ignoring information, communication barriers, or mission-critical employees), identifying groups, and forecasting the impact of various changes in personnel or resources on information diffusion and general performance. ORA produces numerous measures for evaluating structures and processes based on evidence from in social network theory, operations research, and organizational theory. Using ORA, researchers can visualize network relationships and view reports.
METHODS: Survey data were collected from nursing staff on seven medical/surgical units in 3 Arizona hospitals on two days in the same week. Days were chosen to include as many staff as possible to evaluate the stability of the network with different staff. Each staff member was given a questionnaire that listed the names of staff scheduled to work on their current shift, the previous shift and the following shift. Staff were asked to place a checkmark by the names of those staff scheduled to work on that day with whom they had interacted, and to rate how often they had discussed patient care with those persons, using a scale from 1 = never to 5 = constantly. Demographic data about age, experience, and education were collected. Questionnaires were constructed so that staff names were listed on overlays that respondents discarded before returning. Under the overlay, each staff listed was represented by a code (e.g., RN24 or UC3). Unit outcome data (e.g., falls) were collected from hospitals separately for a 3-month period.
The de-identified data were entered into ORA by nursing unit and data collection day. Separate networks were created in ORA for each question (interaction and care discussion) and collection day. Spearman's rho (p) correlation was used to compare the rank order of unit network variables with total falls with significance set at p < .10 because of the small sample.
RESULTS: Network stability was observed across the two days, despite most staff being different. When we examined the interaction network (staff told us they interacted with) for Day 1, total falls were positively correlated with the frequency of cliques in which individual staff were connected to groups of highly connected staff. When we explored the Day 1 discussion network (in which staff rated the frequency of discussing patient care with others), total falls were positively correlated with the degree of clustering (cliques) and with the number of triads (3-person groups) in the network.
IMPLICATIONS: ORA offers the researcher a unique tool for exploring the impact of communication networks on patient outcomes. This exploratory analysis suggests that falls are more frequent in communication networks where cliques are more prevalent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWHAT CAN ORA REVEAL?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157491-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">WHAT CAN ORA REVEAL?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Effken, Judith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeffken@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Denise Bianchi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: We will report results of a study using a network analysis tool (ORA) to investigate how communication networks on nursing units might affect patient safety outcomes. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Communication is frequently implicated as contributing to patient safety issues (e.g., medication errors or falls). We used ORAORA is a computer-based network analysis tool for detecting risks or vulnerabilities in organizations (e.g., groupthink tendencies, ignoring information, communication barriers, or mission-critical employees), identifying groups, and forecasting the impact of various changes in personnel or resources on information diffusion and general performance. ORA produces numerous measures for evaluating structures and processes based on evidence from in social network theory, operations research, and organizational theory. Using ORA, researchers can visualize network relationships and view reports. <br/>METHODS: Survey data were collected from nursing staff on seven medical/surgical units in 3 Arizona hospitals on two days in the same week. Days were chosen to include as many staff as possible to evaluate the stability of the network with different staff. Each staff member was given a questionnaire that listed the names of staff scheduled to work on their current shift, the previous shift and the following shift. Staff were asked to place a checkmark by the names of those staff scheduled to work on that day with whom they had interacted, and to rate how often they had discussed patient care with those persons, using a scale from 1 = never to 5 = constantly. Demographic data about age, experience, and education were collected. Questionnaires were constructed so that staff names were listed on overlays that respondents discarded before returning. Under the overlay, each staff listed was represented by a code (e.g., RN24 or UC3). Unit outcome data (e.g., falls) were collected from hospitals separately for a 3-month period. <br/>The de-identified data were entered into ORA by nursing unit and data collection day. Separate networks were created in ORA for each question (interaction and care discussion) and collection day. Spearman's rho (p) correlation was used to compare the rank order of unit network variables with total falls with significance set at p &lt; .10 because of the small sample.<br/> RESULTS: Network stability was observed across the two days, despite most staff being different. When we examined the interaction network (staff told us they interacted with) for Day 1, total falls were positively correlated with the frequency of cliques in which individual staff were connected to groups of highly connected staff. When we explored the Day 1 discussion network (in which staff rated the frequency of discussing patient care with others), total falls were positively correlated with the degree of clustering (cliques) and with the number of triads (3-person groups) in the network. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: ORA offers the researcher a unique tool for exploring the impact of communication networks on patient outcomes. This exploratory analysis suggests that falls are more frequent in communication networks where cliques are more prevalent.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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