LIVED EXPERIENCES OF NURSE CARING BEHAVIORS AND ATTITUDES BY WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157492
Type:
Presentation
Title:
LIVED EXPERIENCES OF NURSE CARING BEHAVIORS AND ATTITUDES BY WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS
Abstract:
LIVED EXPERIENCES OF NURSE CARING BEHAVIORS AND ATTITUDES BY WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Embler, Pamela Jane, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alaska Anchorage
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3211 Providence Drive, PSB 110A, Anchorage, AK, 99645, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study was to investigate women with chronic illnessesÆ experiences with nurses that shape their perceptions of nurse caring behaviors and attitudes.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Caring is multifaceted warranting investigation to gain an understanding of its complexities. How do women with chronic illness perceive being cared about or cared for by nurses?
METHODS:
This was a descriptive phenomenological study rooted in the philosophical tenets of Merleau-Ponty and interpreted by GiorgiÆs procedural steps. Interviews were analyzed for patterns of similar descriptions. Participants were five women ages eighteen and older who have a history of chronic illness and were recruited from the Alaska Heart Institute, Alaska.
RESULTS:
The RESULTS: indicated that what is believed by the nurse to be an expression of caring is not always what is received by the client as caring. Five shared patterned descriptions were:
1. Experiences from past caring interactions carry over to future caring interactions;
2. Caring is reflective of the nurseÆs ability to protect human dignity and safeguard humanity;
3. The formulation of trust is dependent upon caring interactions;
4. Collaborative care among the client, the family member, and the nurse is dependent upon caring interactions;
5. And caring interactions are reflective of the nurses commitment to professionalism and career satisfaction.
IMPLICATIONS:
The implication to nursing practice is that the client population is transforming from one of acute illness and acute care to chronic illness and long-term care in the outpatient setting. The nurse-client paradigm must change to meet the needs of this different client. Understanding the clients perceptions of feeling cared about or cared for by nurses is pivotal not only as reactionary to the change in client demographics but also this change must be approached proactively if nurses are to meet clients where they exist on the illness continuum.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLIVED EXPERIENCES OF NURSE CARING BEHAVIORS AND ATTITUDES BY WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157492-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">LIVED EXPERIENCES OF NURSE CARING BEHAVIORS AND ATTITUDES BY WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Embler, Pamela Jane, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alaska Anchorage</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3211 Providence Drive, PSB 110A, Anchorage, AK, 99645, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">afpje@uaa.alaska.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purpose of this study was to investigate women with chronic illnesses&AElig; experiences with nurses that shape their perceptions of nurse caring behaviors and attitudes. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Caring is multifaceted warranting investigation to gain an understanding of its complexities. How do women with chronic illness perceive being cared about or cared for by nurses? <br/>METHODS: <br/>This was a descriptive phenomenological study rooted in the philosophical tenets of Merleau-Ponty and interpreted by Giorgi&AElig;s procedural steps. Interviews were analyzed for patterns of similar descriptions. Participants were five women ages eighteen and older who have a history of chronic illness and were recruited from the Alaska Heart Institute, Alaska. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>The RESULTS: indicated that what is believed by the nurse to be an expression of caring is not always what is received by the client as caring. Five shared patterned descriptions were: <br/>1. Experiences from past caring interactions carry over to future caring interactions; <br/>2. Caring is reflective of the nurse&AElig;s ability to protect human dignity and safeguard humanity; <br/>3. The formulation of trust is dependent upon caring interactions; <br/>4. Collaborative care among the client, the family member, and the nurse is dependent upon caring interactions; <br/>5. And caring interactions are reflective of the nurses commitment to professionalism and career satisfaction. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>The implication to nursing practice is that the client population is transforming from one of acute illness and acute care to chronic illness and long-term care in the outpatient setting. The nurse-client paradigm must change to meet the needs of this different client. Understanding the clients perceptions of feeling cared about or cared for by nurses is pivotal not only as reactionary to the change in client demographics but also this change must be approached proactively if nurses are to meet clients where they exist on the illness continuum. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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