2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157497
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH DIABETES
Abstract:
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH DIABETES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Faulkner, Melissa Spezia, DSN, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Gladys E. Sorensen Endowed Professor
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin Avenue, P.O. Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Sara Fleet Michaliszyn; Joseph T. Hepworth; Daniel Lopez
PURPOSES/AIMS: This study sought to discern monthly patterns of the intensity levels and durations of physical activity among adolescents with either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who were enrolled in a 16-week personalized exercise program. A secondary aim was to analyze physical activity patterns based upon gender or type of diabetes.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: According to the American Diabetes Association, the prevalence of diabetes increased 13.5% from 2005-2007 in the United States. Approximately 1 in 500 adolescents are diagnosed with diabetes. Physical activity is a hallmark of diabetes management and may help to diminish or prevent the development of secondary complications from diabetes. Limited research is available on physical activity interventions with youth who have diabetes. Given the evidence that lifestyle behaviors track to adulthood, strategies to promote and sustain an active lifestyle early is paramount for youth living with diabetes. The personalized exercise program in this study was guided by social cognitive theory.
METHODS: Participants were included if they were not actively exercising. Adolescents completed individual fitness testing and were instructed to wear an Actigraph GT1M accelerometer during waking hours throughout the 16-week intervention. We present time spent at different levels of intensity as the average in minutes/day for each month. Using metabolic equivalents (METs) as the measure of energy expenditure, we report the time that participants spent in moderate (equal to or greater than 3.0 to <6.0 METS) or moderate-to-vigorous (equal to or greater than 3.0 METS) physical activity (MVPA). Repeated measures analysis of variance using SPSS version 16.0 was used to determine monthly time differences and patterns in moderate activity or MVPA for the total sample, time by gender interactions and patterns, and time by diagnosis interactions and patterns.
RESULTS: The sample consisted of 17 adolescents (10 males; 7 females); mean age, 14.1 ¦ 1.4 yrs. There were 13 with T1DM and 4 with T2DM whose diabetes duration was 5.6 +/- 3.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.5 years, BMI was 22.8 +/- 4.7 vs. 34.7 +/- 9.1, and baseline A1c was 9.2 +/- 1.7% vs. 7.4 +/- 0.7%, respectively. There were no significant monthly differences in moderate activity or MVPA for the total sample or by gender. The total sample achieved an average of 41.6 +/- 18.5 minutes/day of MVPA across all 4 months of the intervention. The difference in the mean MVPA minutes/day between adolescents with T2DM (M = 53) and T1DM (M = 39) suggested a trend [F (1,15) = 2.59, p=.13]. Although there was no significant difference in baseline to post-test measures of A1c, there was a significant negative correlation between the average percent of MVPA and A1c change (r = -.54, P = .03).
IMPLICATIONS: Adolescents with diabetes who were previously inactive consistently achieved approximately equal 42 minutes/day of MVPA throughout the intervention. There were no between-gender differences in physical activity intensity. However, adolescents with T2DM vs. T1DM exhibited longer durations of MVPA. Adolescents with greater amounts of MVPA had the largest decline in A1c levels, thus improved glucose control. Engaging adolescents with diabetes in regular MVPA can lower glucose levels.
Funding: NINR 7R21 NR009267-02
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH DIABETESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157497-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH DIABETES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Faulkner, Melissa Spezia, DSN, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Gladys E. Sorensen Endowed Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin Avenue, P.O. Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mfaulkner@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sara Fleet Michaliszyn; Joseph T. Hepworth; Daniel Lopez</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: This study sought to discern monthly patterns of the intensity levels and durations of physical activity among adolescents with either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who were enrolled in a 16-week personalized exercise program. A secondary aim was to analyze physical activity patterns based upon gender or type of diabetes.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: According to the American Diabetes Association, the prevalence of diabetes increased 13.5% from 2005-2007 in the United States. Approximately 1 in 500 adolescents are diagnosed with diabetes. Physical activity is a hallmark of diabetes management and may help to diminish or prevent the development of secondary complications from diabetes. Limited research is available on physical activity interventions with youth who have diabetes. Given the evidence that lifestyle behaviors track to adulthood, strategies to promote and sustain an active lifestyle early is paramount for youth living with diabetes. The personalized exercise program in this study was guided by social cognitive theory. <br/>METHODS: Participants were included if they were not actively exercising. Adolescents completed individual fitness testing and were instructed to wear an Actigraph GT1M accelerometer during waking hours throughout the 16-week intervention. We present time spent at different levels of intensity as the average in minutes/day for each month. Using metabolic equivalents (METs) as the measure of energy expenditure, we report the time that participants spent in moderate (equal to or greater than 3.0 to &lt;6.0 METS) or moderate-to-vigorous (equal to or greater than 3.0 METS) physical activity (MVPA). Repeated measures analysis of variance using SPSS version 16.0 was used to determine monthly time differences and patterns in moderate activity or MVPA for the total sample, time by gender interactions and patterns, and time by diagnosis interactions and patterns. <br/>RESULTS: The sample consisted of 17 adolescents (10 males; 7 females); mean age, 14.1 &brvbar; 1.4 yrs. There were 13 with T1DM and 4 with T2DM whose diabetes duration was 5.6 +/- 3.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.5 years, BMI was 22.8 +/- 4.7 vs. 34.7 +/- 9.1, and baseline A1c was 9.2 +/- 1.7% vs. 7.4 +/- 0.7%, respectively. There were no significant monthly differences in moderate activity or MVPA for the total sample or by gender. The total sample achieved an average of 41.6 +/- 18.5 minutes/day of MVPA across all 4 months of the intervention. The difference in the mean MVPA minutes/day between adolescents with T2DM (M = 53) and T1DM (M = 39) suggested a trend [F (1,15) = 2.59, p=.13]. Although there was no significant difference in baseline to post-test measures of A1c, there was a significant negative correlation between the average percent of MVPA and A1c change (r = -.54, P = .03).<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Adolescents with diabetes who were previously inactive consistently achieved approximately equal 42 minutes/day of MVPA throughout the intervention. There were no between-gender differences in physical activity intensity. However, adolescents with T2DM vs. T1DM exhibited longer durations of MVPA. Adolescents with greater amounts of MVPA had the largest decline in A1c levels, thus improved glucose control. Engaging adolescents with diabetes in regular MVPA can lower glucose levels.<br/>Funding: NINR 7R21 NR009267-02<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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