2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157498
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BARRIERS TO HEALTHY EATING FOR CHILDREN IN RURAL OREGON
Abstract:
BARRIERS TO HEALTHY EATING FOR CHILDREN IN RURAL OREGON
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA
Co-Authors:Victoria W. Brogoitti; Linda Jerofke; Yvonne L. Michael
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to describe environmental barriers to healthy eating among rural children. Policy recommendations for addressing the barriers and creating a more healthful environment will be provided.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Rural populations are at high risk for childhood obesity. A recent national study found that rural children were 25% more likely to be overweight than their urban counterparts, even after controlling for income, race, and other known risk factors. Although it is believed that environmental factors are at the root of this disparity, little is known about the effect of the rural environment on children's diets. Using community-based participatory research, community and university collaborators conducted an assessment of rural schools and communities to identify factors that influenced children's food choices. This research was the first phase in a multi-year effort to reduce childhood obesity in a rural Oregon county.
METHODS: Data were collected in all county schools and communities. Semi-structured interviews with school and community leaders; focus groups with elementary school teachers, students, and parents; a school self-assessment using the Centers for Disease Control's School Health Index; photo voice, which involved high school students in taking pictures of community features; document review; and field observation in grocery stores and schools provided data that were triangulated to produce a composite of environmental barriers and assets.
RESULTS: Limited access to healthy foods in small community markets, easy access to convenience stores selling unhealthy foods, and busy lifestyles (which made preparation of home-cooked meals an uncommon practice) were factors within communities that hindered healthy eating. The extensive use of USDA-donated commodities and other pre-packaged, processed foods in school meals; access to high fat and sugar-sweetened snacks or beverages; frequent use of candy and other "sweets" as incentives or rewards for good behavior; and the fact that teachers did not always model healthy eating habits were barriers within the school setting. The agricultural surroundings and the popularity of gardening were assets, but had little effect on children's diets.
IMPLICATIONS: Addressing these barriers will require economic, structural, and social change. Potential interventions include providing incentives or subsidies to expand the variety of healthy foods in small community markets; implementing school gardens and farm-to-school programs; strengthening and enforcing School Wellness Policies; and improving the nutritional quality of USDA-donated commodity foods. To achieve these changes, policy-makers must be educated about the barriers to healthy eating that exist in rural communities. Nurses can play an important role in educating policy makers and advocating for change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBARRIERS TO HEALTHY EATING FOR CHILDREN IN RURAL OREGONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157498-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">BARRIERS TO HEALTHY EATING FOR CHILDREN IN RURAL OREGON</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Findholt, Nancy E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One University Boulevard, La Grande, OR, 97850, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">findholt@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Victoria W. Brogoitti; Linda Jerofke; Yvonne L. Michael</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to describe environmental barriers to healthy eating among rural children. Policy recommendations for addressing the barriers and creating a more healthful environment will be provided. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Rural populations are at high risk for childhood obesity. A recent national study found that rural children were 25% more likely to be overweight than their urban counterparts, even after controlling for income, race, and other known risk factors. Although it is believed that environmental factors are at the root of this disparity, little is known about the effect of the rural environment on children's diets. Using community-based participatory research, community and university collaborators conducted an assessment of rural schools and communities to identify factors that influenced children's food choices. This research was the first phase in a multi-year effort to reduce childhood obesity in a rural Oregon county. <br/>METHODS: Data were collected in all county schools and communities. Semi-structured interviews with school and community leaders; focus groups with elementary school teachers, students, and parents; a school self-assessment using the Centers for Disease Control's School Health Index; photo voice, which involved high school students in taking pictures of community features; document review; and field observation in grocery stores and schools provided data that were triangulated to produce a composite of environmental barriers and assets. <br/>RESULTS: Limited access to healthy foods in small community markets, easy access to convenience stores selling unhealthy foods, and busy lifestyles (which made preparation of home-cooked meals an uncommon practice) were factors within communities that hindered healthy eating. The extensive use of USDA-donated commodities and other pre-packaged, processed foods in school meals; access to high fat and sugar-sweetened snacks or beverages; frequent use of candy and other &quot;sweets&quot; as incentives or rewards for good behavior; and the fact that teachers did not always model healthy eating habits were barriers within the school setting. The agricultural surroundings and the popularity of gardening were assets, but had little effect on children's diets. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Addressing these barriers will require economic, structural, and social change. Potential interventions include providing incentives or subsidies to expand the variety of healthy foods in small community markets; implementing school gardens and farm-to-school programs; strengthening and enforcing School Wellness Policies; and improving the nutritional quality of USDA-donated commodity foods. To achieve these changes, policy-makers must be educated about the barriers to healthy eating that exist in rural communities. Nurses can play an important role in educating policy makers and advocating for change. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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