2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157499
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USING THE CHARRETTE TO ENHANCE COMMUNITY ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPS
Abstract:
USING THE CHARRETTE TO ENHANCE COMMUNITY ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Fleury, Julie, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Dean for Research, Director, PhD in Nursing & Healthcare Innovation Program
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller; Adriana Perez; Allison Nagle
PURPOSES/AIMS: Obesity and its concomitant conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease disproportionally effect Hispanics, making it a significant health concern. This concern is reflected across all age groups, supporting an intergenerational focus. This paper describes a community-academic partnership, using a Charrette model, to develop socially and culturally relevant programs fostering intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity. A Charrette is a participatory action model originally developed in architecture and commonly used in urban planning, which involves the gathering of a diverse team over a specific time frame to address an identified need within a community.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The community-academic partnership described is within Central City South (CCS, a vibrant, urban, ethnically diverse community where health and environmental inequities have been concentrated over time. Creative solutions that take into account the history and the existing cultural knowledge of residents, and that identify effective socially-based strengths provide a basis for supporting positive health and environmental change at the community level.
METHODS: Components of a Charette include: definition of issues to be resolved; analysis of the problem and alternative approaches to solutions; assignment of small groups to clarify issues; development of proposals to respond to issues; development of alternative solutions; presentation and analysis of final proposal(s); and consensus and final resolution of the approach to be taken. The use of innovative strategies, such as photo novella, allows community members to share their experiences and identify issues and concerns, as well as strengths and resources, based on their own perspective. Through integrating collaborative research, student training and community liaison into the project, we support community efforts to create sustainable health and environmental solutions, but also develop, test and disseminate better ways to operationalize culture and community-building in problem-driven social science research and intervention design.
RESULTS: Community residents have identified obesity as one of their most pressing concerns. Specific obesity-related needs identified by the residents include the need for: (a) health education, (b) physical activity programs, and (c) recreational activities to promote health and well-being. The community-academic partnership reflects a process which includes: (a) strong and relevant learning experiences for students and community members; (b) opportunities to design and test new models for capacity-building within a community; (c) opportunities to address intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity in the CCS neighborhood; (d) neighborhood connections to community leaders, policy makers, and academic resources; (e) student, faculty, and community engagement; and (f) enhanced resources to address health promotion related to obesity across generations and related health concerns in a meaningful way.
IMPLICATIONS: The Charrette provides an important and relevant mechanism for community-academic partnerships to develop socially and culturally relevant programs fostering intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity. The process described fosters a unique interface between community members, an urban university faculty and students in a partnership for health promotion related to specific community identified health issues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSING THE CHARRETTE TO ENHANCE COMMUNITY ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157499-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">USING THE CHARRETTE TO ENHANCE COMMUNITY ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleury, Julie, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research, Director, PhD in Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Julie.Fleury@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller; Adriana Perez; Allison Nagle</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: Obesity and its concomitant conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease disproportionally effect Hispanics, making it a significant health concern. This concern is reflected across all age groups, supporting an intergenerational focus. This paper describes a community-academic partnership, using a Charrette model, to develop socially and culturally relevant programs fostering intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity. A Charrette is a participatory action model originally developed in architecture and commonly used in urban planning, which involves the gathering of a diverse team over a specific time frame to address an identified need within a community. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The community-academic partnership described is within Central City South (CCS, a vibrant, urban, ethnically diverse community where health and environmental inequities have been concentrated over time. Creative solutions that take into account the history and the existing cultural knowledge of residents, and that identify effective socially-based strengths provide a basis for supporting positive health and environmental change at the community level. <br/>METHODS: Components of a Charette include: definition of issues to be resolved; analysis of the problem and alternative approaches to solutions; assignment of small groups to clarify issues; development of proposals to respond to issues; development of alternative solutions; presentation and analysis of final proposal(s); and consensus and final resolution of the approach to be taken. The use of innovative strategies, such as photo novella, allows community members to share their experiences and identify issues and concerns, as well as strengths and resources, based on their own perspective. Through integrating collaborative research, student training and community liaison into the project, we support community efforts to create sustainable health and environmental solutions, but also develop, test and disseminate better ways to operationalize culture and community-building in problem-driven social science research and intervention design. <br/>RESULTS: Community residents have identified obesity as one of their most pressing concerns. Specific obesity-related needs identified by the residents include the need for: (a) health education, (b) physical activity programs, and (c) recreational activities to promote health and well-being. The community-academic partnership reflects a process which includes: (a) strong and relevant learning experiences for students and community members; (b) opportunities to design and test new models for capacity-building within a community; (c) opportunities to address intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity in the CCS neighborhood; (d) neighborhood connections to community leaders, policy makers, and academic resources; (e) student, faculty, and community engagement; and (f) enhanced resources to address health promotion related to obesity across generations and related health concerns in a meaningful way.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The Charrette provides an important and relevant mechanism for community-academic partnerships to develop socially and culturally relevant programs fostering intergenerational capacity for health promotion related to obesity. The process described fosters a unique interface between community members, an urban university faculty and students in a partnership for health promotion related to specific community identified health issues. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.